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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Model 1894 Saddle Ring Carbine Cal. 32/40, mfg. 1908

Model 94 Eastern Carbine Cal. 32ws with special order 2/3 magazine and Whelen style butt stock seldom seen on a model 94

Model 1894 "Trapper" Saddle Ring Carbine Cal 30wcf with 15" barrel mfg. 1917

Model 1894 "Trapper" Saddle Ring Carbine cal 25/35 with 14" barrel and special order rear barrel sight mfg. 1907. A true "one of a kind".

Both trapper models have BATF NFA withdrawl letters.
 

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Re: 4 Rare 1894 Carbines

AzDave said:
Both trapper models have BATF NFA withdrawal letters.
That is a very nice collection.

I have heard of this BATF letter before and would like to know the details. Does this mean that these rifles are not subject to NFA regulations because of their collectable status. What is required for such a rifle to have one of these letters?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In order to possess any rifle with a barrel lenght less than 16" you must have a BATF NFA withdrawl letter for that rifle. To receive a withdrawl letter you must send the rifle to the BATF in Washington D.C. for their inspection. If they can verify that the rifle is in it's factory original configuration with the short barrel, they will issue a NFA withdrawl letter to you and return the firearm to you. If however they determine the short barrel is not original to the rifle, they remove the barrel and return the rest of the rifle to you.
 
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Does this mean that the rifle is exempt from NFA requirements or that it is subject to the NFA and can be transferred as an AOW for $5.00?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When the BATF issues the withdrawl letter the firearm is removed from the provisions of the NFA and is now classified as a curio or relic. It is still a firearm as defined in 18 U.S.C., section 921 (a) (3).
 

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AzDave,

Very cool rifles - I'm green with envy.

Since you've shown me yours, I'll show you mine.

In 1927, Winchester made a batch of 44 saddle ring carbines. 34 were made with 20 inch barrels and 10 were made with 22 inch barrels. Here's the kicker - The barrel twist on these guns is 1-10, not the traditional 1-12.

The barrels on these guns were left over from a production run of Winchester 95 NRA Muskets in .30-06. They were turned down and re-chambered for .30WCF and put on guns so as not to waste the barrels. All the correct stamping for the 94 is on the barrel, but it's clearly a 95 barrel. There is a screw plug, plugging the screw hole for the 95 Musket rear sight, there is a dovetail cut in the underside of the barrel for the 95 forend mount and the front sight is clearly that of a model 95.

This 22 inch carbine was bought new in 1928 by my grandfather, and given to me three weeks before he died. It is one of only ten known to exist.

Yes, I shoot it and hunt with it on a regular basis.

GunGeek
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
GunGeek

I have known about the 1895 barreled model 94's for a long time and would love to have one for my very own. The 1895 barreled 94's are a highly prized collectable Winchester. I do not have one in my collection and I have never seen one, only photo's. Very Nice !!!

When I started gun collecting many years ago I started with the model 1894 Winchester and then moved on to all Winchester lever actions, but the model 1894 is still a favorite.

Next week I will post some photos of a few special order model 1894 Rifles.

Thanks for posting the picture of your 94, a great piece !!!
 
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