Gun Hub Forums banner

AR-15 chambered in 5.56 or .223?

  • 5.56

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • .223

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • What ever you want.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Going to get me an AR-15, 20 in 1 in 9 twist from a parts kits. They have 5.56 and .223. Which one?

I know that 5.56 chambers are a little larger than .223. I am going to use once fired mil-brass using .223 Lee dies maybe, Haven't bought the dies yet. I want your opions and sujections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
There is a 223 SAAMI chamber and then there's all manner of modified 223 chambers.

Most Rock Rivers come with Wylde chambers, designed by AR15 guru Bill Wylde to shoot match ammo for NRA Highpower, but still allow the use of 5.56 NATO.

http://www.njhighpower.com/ then go to "Reloading Stuph"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
890 Posts
I just ordered 3 RRA receivers and 3 parts kits. All of the parts kits have 5.56 chambers.

1. A2 w/bayo lug & fh.

2. Dissipator A2 w/bayo lug & fh.

3. M4 A3, 14 inch barrel w/perm attached phantom fh.

That damn ban better sunset or someone with pre ban receivers will be getting some great deals from me! :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
914 Posts
go with the 5.56 one......this way you will be able to fire any mil-surplus 5.56 rounds out there, as well as the commercial .233, and once fired military brass,


if you go with the .233 chamber, you might run into problems firing mil-surplus ammo or brass, as each country's 5.56 has slight variations in dimentions and with a tighter 223 chamber, you may run into problems with extracing, and chambering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Both of my AR's have the 5.56 chamber because I always shoot surplus GI ammo but like to have the option of chambering .223 if I need to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I'm going to say go with a .223 since you've already said you're loading with .223 dies, no you won't be able to use surplus ammo, but if you're reloading already, you're probably not terribly concerned with buying surplus ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Are there such things as 5.56 dies? I think I have seen them at one time, but where?

I was thinking about .223 because the chamber is tighter so the brass will last longer, but I am planing to shoot mil surplus too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
5.56/.223

Personally...5.56(lots of surplus to burn up). I know that this has been beat to death but... It seems that my mini-14 feeds and shoots about any thing I can stuff into the mag. My AR15 is more picky about what I feed it. Example, reloading and you sorta over do it on the re-sizer (just slightly). My AR15 will not close on it even with forward assist. I put the same cartridge in my Mini and drop the bolt on it...no problem. YES I know this is not a good practice, and I do not usally do this. I most likely pull the bullet and trash the bad casing (safest bet). My point is in re-loading, make sure the settings are perfect or the AR15 will burp on you.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Interesting reading.

*************************************************************
ENFORCEMENT ? NEWS ? 05/04/2001




.223 Rem VS 5.56mm


Paul Nowak

05/04/2001

.223 Rem VS 5.56mm
There are a lot of questions about these two cartridges. Many people think they are identical - merely different designations for commercial and military. The truth is that, although somewhat similar, they are not the same and you should know the differences before buying either cartridge.


The cartridge casings for both calibers have basically the same length and exterior dimensions.
The 5.56 round, loaded to Military Specification, typically has higher velocity and chamber pressure than the .223 Rem.
The 5.56 cartridge case may have thicker walls, and a thicker head, for extra strength. This better contains the higher chamber pressure. However, a thicker case reduces powder capacity, which is of concern to the reloader.
The 5.56mm and .223 Rem chambers are nearly identical. The difference is in the "Leade". Leade is defined as the portion of the barrel directly in front of the chamber where the rifling has been conically removed to allow room for the seated bullet. It is also more commonly known as the throat. Leade in a .223 Rem chamber is usually .085". In a 5.56mm chamber the leade is typically .162", or almost twice as much as in the 223 Rem chamber.
You can fire .223 Rem cartridges in 5.56mm chambers with this longer leade, but you will generally have a slight loss in accuracy and velocity over firing the .223 round in the chamber with the shorter leade it was designed for.
Problems may occur when firing the higher-pressure 5.56mm cartridge in a .223 chamber with its much shorter leade. It is generally known that shortening the leade can dramatically increase chamber pressure. In some cases, this higher pressure could result in primer pocket gas leaks, blown cartridge case heads and gun functioning issues.
The 5.56mm military cartridge fired in a .223 Rem chamber is considered by SAAMI (Small Arm and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute) to be an unsafe ammunition combination.
Before buying either of these two types of ammunition, always check your gun to find what caliber it is chambered for, then buy the appropriate ammunition. Most 5.56mm rounds made have full metal jacket bullets. Performance bullets - soft points, hollow points, Ballistic Silvertips, etc. - are loaded in .223 Rem cartridges. Firing a .223 Rem cartridge in a 5.56mm-chambered gun is safe and merely gives you slightly reduced velocity and accuracy. However we do not recommend, nor does SAAMI recommend, firing a 5.56mm cartridge in a gun chambered for the .223 Rem as the shorter leade can cause pressure-related problems.

Winchester Law Enforcement Ammunition East Alton Illinois

************************************************** **


Karsen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Yup, I ran afoul of this when I had a little single shot break action handi rifle rechambered from .22 Hornet to .223 Remington. When I tried shooting 5.56 in it the brass would stick in the chamber and the extractor would not pull it out. I hand load 40 grain hollowpoints in commercial brass and the brass shoots right out of the chamber when the action is broken open. 55 grain 5.56 would also key hole on the targets because o of the rifing twist. 40 grainers go in the same hole at 100 yards. This is fine as this was originally intended for coyote hunting, for which it excels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the info and the copy of the artical guys. I will be getting my AR chambered in 5.56. I do plan to reload, but also shoot mil surplus whenever I run accross a good deal, get lazy, or just happen to find a stock pile of Lake City ammo in 50 cal cans in the woods one day, (yeah right :roll: ).

Are there any problems using .223 dies on 5.56 mil brass? Got 2000 brass already. Also are there 5.56 dies?
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top