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Discussion Starter #1
I once owned a Howa 1500 in .243 that would shoot 1/3" groups with boring regularity. It was poorly bedded and only one locking lug was in full contact, but it still shot that well. But other than the accuracy, the rifle wasn't exactly a heavy barrel, but the rifle was just much heavier than I would want in a .243; I sold it off and have never had or seen another .243 that shot that well.

Had a Browning A bolt in .280 that I just didn't like other than the fact that it shot 1/2" groups all day long; sold it.

Now I have this Python that I've always wanted and I've learned that I'm just a S&W man. Don't get me wrong, I like the gun, I just don't like it nearly as much as my S&W's. But MAN does it shoot. At 25 yards it shoots well under 1" and tickles 1/2" quite often (probably is a 1/2" gun if I really got serious). At 150 yards shooting at clay pigeons against my backstop, this revolver just plain makes me look GOOD. But I've been thinking of selling it.

So, do I keep it or do I sell it. I don't have any other handgun that shoots nearly as good as it does. In fact, it's made me realize that I'm a better shot than I thought I was; which is probably reason enough to keep it. Or reason enough to accurize some of my other guns.


On the other side, if I sell the Python, I'm thinking of getting a serious target .22 pistol. S&W 41, Browning Medalist, High Standard Victor, or perhaps just a Marvel conversion unit for a 1911.

Any advice for this old hack?
 

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I agree with you that accuracy isn't everything. Most of my "most shot" guns aren't my most accurate guns. For whatever reason, one bonds with a gun or one doesn't. Accuracy alone isn't necessarily a deal-maker or deal-breaker.

That said, I'd keep the Python. They're doing nothing but getting more valuable, and if you sell it now, and start thinking fondly of it two or three years from now, you might not be able to afford another. Hang on to it and I'll bet five or six years from now, you'll be glad you did. If not, by then, you can trade it for a summer cottage on a lake somewhere.
 

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Accuracy rarely had anything to do with regret over selling a gun. Accurate guns aren't hard to find but neat ones are.

I've actually owned several Pythons and don't regret selling any of them and I can't say that they are any more accurate than higher end S&Ws. I really, really, tried to love them because everybody said I should...

If you want a really good .22 auto look for a 60s vintage Model 41 or High Standard Citation or Trophy. The Citation was every bit as accurate just didn't have the polish and gold doo-dahs. I still have the M41 I bought when uncle sam quit furnishing guns.

Among the guns I shoot regularly for fun I guess it would be fair to say the only reason I shoot them is because they are accurate... at least enough for what I want to do...
 

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Charlie Petty said:
I've actually owned several Pythons and don't regret selling any of them and I can't say that they are any more accurate than higher end S&Ws. I really, really, tried to love them because everybody said I should...
I own two, a 6" and a 4". The 6" is probably the most accurate handgun I've ever shot, certainly the most accurate revolver. The 4" is, as in your experience, no more (or less) accurate than any of my .357 Smiths.

I've bonded with the 6"; the 4", not so much. It's just a working, shooting gun to me, though I still think it's kinda cool.
 

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Savage 110 with accutrigger, yup, it shot like crazy, but it was ugly, and that trigger just looked flimsy. I went back to my Savage 99's, they just look "woodsy"
 

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Had a Mossberg target rifle that shot little bitty groups with Eley ammo. Sold it on the range to a guy who watched me shoot those itty bitty groups. Darn thing was just too heavy for anything other than target shooting and it hated anything other than Eley ammo.

On the other hand, I have a Mauser action Parker Hale in .30-06 that is very easy to shoot though it's not particularly accurate. In fact, if I get another rifle built, I'm going to try and duplicate the balance - darn thing works for me.

Kevin, agree that keeping the Python for investment purposes is a good idea if you can afford it.
 

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This may be unfair of me but... you all know I am a big fan of King stuff and all the Python is is a copy of something King did 30-40 years earlier
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Charlie Petty said:
This may be unfair of me but... you all know I am a big fan of King stuff and all the Python is is a copy of something King did 30-40 years earlier
I would think that would make you a fan of the Python since King's is long gone.
 

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In the 70s I once had a new Sako .222 heavy barrel varminter. It shot like nobody's business, but I never much cared for it. It was heavy, clunky, had that God-awful ugly shiny plastic wood finish, like the Brownings of the day, but the metal was sort of a flat, dull finish. Ugly combination. Kept it for a few years, then sold it.
 

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I've got a T/C Contender with a couple of barrels, including a 6.5 Ingram (basically a .223 necked up to 6.5mm . . . 140 @ 2100 in a 15" barrel) from when I was shooting IHMSA. Accurate as all get out with every barrel, and that includes a .357 "Hot Shot" barrel that puts my cast bullets into one ragged hole at 25 yards. But I just never really warmed up to it . . . why? :dunno:

(My Dad had one, too, and I inherited his . . . so I actually have two.)

felix's tattoo said:
. . . that God-awful ugly shiny plastic wood finish, like the Brownings of the day . . .
I have a Browning Safari in .375 like that . . . or at least, it was like that. Aside from some sight & bedding work the shiny stock made the rifle unsuitable for serious hunting . . . yet it fit me better than any factory rifle I've hefted before or since. So I just went ahead and wet sanded it to dull the shine. It turned out with a really nice satin finish, and with bead-blasted blue metal there are no game-spooking reflections. So shiny stocks CAN be fixed!
 

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I fixed a set of wood for the Browning shotguns that had that ugly plastic finish as well. I used the ammonia soap treatment that I was telling Charlie about. A little elbow grease, and about 3 treatments, using a 3M pad, and I got rid of it. Amazing stuff, that ammonia soap!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A felt pad and Brownell’s stock rubbing compound will take the shine off of a Browning epoxy finished stock. Don’t remove the finish, because that epoxy finish is very water resistant and really great for the field.
 

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I have a Mosberg .22 S/L/LR Model 46BT. The tube magazine will handle all three intermixed with no problems. The barrel is about 7/8ths" though I've never measured it. The gun has a plastic trigger guard and an inleted metal sling holder at the front of the stock and a screwed-in at the rear. My dad gave it to me when I was 11 or 12 years old. That would be either 1936 or 37.

The rifle is drilled and tapped for a scope which I have never been able to find. The peep sight has 5 different size peepholes, each brought up by twisting the sight body to the right. The covered front sight has 4 posts in it, 2 posts, one thin, one fat, a bead post and a globe post with a hole in it. It is very accurate at 50' but it will shoot out to about 100 yds accurately.

I've never been able to find this model gun listed in any Mosberg catalog or Gun Parts listing. That model number is stamped into the barrel so I know it's correct. I have found other model 46s, just not the BT. It's a good target rifle and has seen a lot of service on the Boy Scout ranges here in PA and in NY when I was a Scout Master.

BobMac
 

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Can't say I've ever owned a gun that was really accurate that I didn't want to keep. To be honest, I have sold some that were very accurate that I'm very sorry I sold. One, for instance, was an older Colt 1911 Gold Cup and the other was a Browning HP. That darn HP would regularly put five, hot loaded, 90 gr. Sierra's into an inch at 25 yds. That's after I had Micro Gunsight put some decent, fully adjustable sights on it.
Does it fill a real need ? Does it "talk to you" ? Kinda sounds like it doesn't. When they stop "talking to me" when I pick'em up, they tend to be headed out the door. E
 

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I always wanted a Python because of how accurate everybody claimed they were. then I bought my first K38. Ran into some friends(Colt Snobs) up at the range right after I developed a round for the K38,4.0 gr.Unique with a 158. I shot rings around both their Pythons. Of course my normal luck prevailed and it was in the shooter safe when it got stolen.

Had a Savage 110CL(Yes, left-handed) in 270Win. once. Thing would shoot ungodly small groups but, I didn't, and still don't, like 270Win. and sold it.
 

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I have never met an accurate gun I did not like!

The only Colt's I ever liked and still do are my Swenson and a 44 US Colt SA converted to 22 rimfire by a man named Croll or Kroll. Shoots like a rifle, almost. He did his work in the times when army surplus Colts were a dime a dozen.
 

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Good taste sir:

I had a SAA converted to .22 with King sights. I assume they did the conversion too but have no documentation. Does yours have adjustable sights.

photos?
 

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Dove tail rear sight, tap for windage. He made an elevation adjustable front sight, screw in the front changes elevation, it cams with a spring,tighten to raise elevation, loosen to lower elevation. From what I can understand this is one he converted after he went blind.

Milled top ramp on the barrel, milled ramp on the side to hold the ejector out for the 22 cartridges. I believe he made the cylinder which indexes right on time as well and set his own made firring pin and set it in the old hammer. I can dry fire it all day and not a mark on the cylinder. One piece grip that was probably the original. Very slight back lash after the sear breaks, I was going to make a trigger stop for it, but decided to do it with electrical tape around the trigger guard behind the trigger instead.

Absolutely beautiful workmanship, plain but all totally devoted to function.

I was researching for an article about him and have some information, but not as much as I should have. From what I have found out he did a lot of these conversions. This one cost me $225 in 1964. It has the US stamp on the frame.

A friend had a Win Mod 52 B sporter. We were sitting on a dam above the outlet, about 100 yards down were some 2 x 4 blocks floating in the swirling water. We shot at them, I beat him and his rifle with the Crowl, we traded firearms and he beat me!

I am getting ready for Blade Show which starts this week in Atlanta, as soon as I have time I will shoot some photos and have my lady post them up.

It is nice to find someone interested in him and his work.
 

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Here she is in all her glory!






This is a revolver that you can look at all day and not see it all. Just for this write up I took her out and did some plinkng. Cambering a round is like closing a vault door, the cartridges slide in tight and subtly click into place. You know exactly where each round is headed if you pay attention. There is no 1 of 6 fliers. The cylinder rotates freely but is tight with very little wobble or play in any direction.
 
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