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Discussion Starter #1
Guess everybody knows about my Bodyguard 38. Well, my USFA just went Tango Uniform.

Right before Thanksgiving, I noticed that the cylinder wasn't locking up right. Turned out the hand spring broke. Sent it back, USFA fixed it, no charge -no problem.

Last night, I was watching Red River on the Western Channel, playing with my...uhh, examining my SSA, and the cylinder quit locking up again.

I really don't want to send this gun off again. I've detail stripped SAA's before, but those were Bounty Hunters and they used a coil spring. The photos I've seen of the flat hand spring looks like it is somehow connected to the hammer. I would really like to order about a half dozen of these and just do the job myself. Can anybody tell me if this is a job a layman can do? Or is it more complicated than it looks?
 

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What is a layman? :wink:

The hand spring goes in a slot and is usually staked in place and it might be hard to get the old one out.

I've never seen a hand spring break but the locking bolt is quite fragile and if one leg breaks off it can cause a similar problem. Fitting one of those is definitely not easy.
 

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Having a collection of Colt & Remington style black powder revolvers I am not unfamiliar with this problem.
In one occasion having disassembled the revolver I discovered the handspring (being a flatmetal piece basically peened into a slot on the front of the hand) was broken, for sure, but the remaining body that was inside the "peen" was loose. I pulled it out with a needle nosed plier. Thinking outside the "box" I took a soda can and a heavy shears and literally cut out a piece of metal and stuck it in the slot, having fashioned it somewhat to resemble the profile of the original part.
It worked fine.
The thing is, those little springs are usually stuck in there pretty tight. The prescribed remedy in the case of the handspring being busted is the replacement of the hand.
If the part can be obtained, be it from Numrich, or the original manufacturer, it will usually be found to be a little long. This is because fitting is required. A long hand will result in cylinder overtravel and the timing is off because of that. Unfortunatly, the solution is to file very tiny bit of the nose of the hand and keep reassembling and working the action until it times right.
I suggest that no Dremel tools be used. :shock: :wink: Yeah I know, but remember, it has to be done tiny bit by tiny bit, and a Dremel will be like using a nuke on an anthill. It'll kill the ants for sure .... but the SIDE EFFECTS. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Charlie Petty said:
What's a layman? :wink:
Uhhh, a male hooker? (lay...man...get it? :ek: It's the best I could do. I'm still on meds!)

Thanks, Charlie., thanks Tommy. Hmmmm...I gues I'll take her apart and see just what i s broke, but I'll probably send her back to the factory. I'm okay with drop-in parts, but i don't know nuthin' 'bout birhthin' no babies...OR handfitting parts on a pistol. (With apologies to Butterfly McQueen).

I had heard that the SAA was fragile, but I must admit I'm somewhat bummed. I've got 100 rds of Hornady Cowboy loads through it. I do work the action and dry fire it a lot, but I put snap caps in it whenever it's not range time. Maybe I just need to leave the USFA for live fire and buy me a Ruger for outdrawing Matt Dillon on the TV. :oops:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Charlie Petty said:
i don't know nuthin' 'bout birhthin' no babies...OR handfitting parts on a pistol. (With apologies to Butterfly McQueen
I want some of those meds :!:
Never saw "Gone With The Wind!" Charlie?

...And no! You can't have any of my meds! They're mine, I tell you! All Mine!!!
Bwahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah!

:help: :help: :help: :help: :lol:
 

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Actually I did, although you left out "miss scarlet" , but I figure that anything that puts you in that frame of mind can't be all bad... :lol:

I really don't like working on SAAs because of all those screws and it takes forever just to take apart and put back together to see if you accomplished anything. It is also so easy to bugger the screws. Brownells has a kit in their magna-tip screwdriver lineup that has all the proper size bits that store in the handle.
 
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