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There has been a lot of work on frangible bullets and "blended metal" is just another name for most of that. Powdered copper, iron, tungsten and other stuff is mixed with a binder and molded into a bullet shape.

I did some testing with an earlier 5.56 type into gelatin and it is spectacular but I'm not sure the technology is legal for combat use or ready for prime time.
 

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Critical thinking would lead one to observe that the temperature of the medium can- in no way be relevant.

The greatest heat the bullet ever sees is going through the barrel with its' ass on fire and then the considerable heat of friction from the air flowing over it. Maybe if one fired it into liquid nitrogen the medium would cool it down, but the bullet is not in contact with any media- flesh or otherwise- long enough for meaningful temperature change.

Ask the guys from Gunstock who burned their fingers fishing bullets out of blocks of gelatin that just came from the frig how efficient that would be.

I learned long ago to never say never but I have a little trouble understanding how a bullet that can be frangible in flesh could penetrate a solid of any kind... glass, metal or fabric armor.

A few years ago I did quite a bit of work with the FN 5.7x28 mentioned in the story. It really would zip through a flak jacket and stop within 12" of gleatin but it is not frangible and has a conventional jacket and alumnium core.
 

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There is a lot of work underway with different frangible materials due to concerns over lead. There has been a lot of jello testing and some produce truly spectacular results and others act like ball ammo.

There is a delicate balance in making frangible bullets so that they really will break up on hard targets but are still tough enough to withstand cycling through a gun. I did some testing years ago with a 5.56 frangible that was pretty light. It functioned well in an M-16 but had virtually no recoil. you could put a 30 round burst into a couple of inches at 25 yd. Fun. The downside of that one turned out to be shelf life and the bullet deteriorated over time.

Everything in that story may be gospel, but there isn't enough information there to convince me... curmudgeon that I am.
 
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