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Nice Winchester indeed! Looks old? We went a shootin today as well here on the Orygun coast

Christmas day 2014.jpg

Christmas day 2014 II.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Naw, not a Winchester. It's a Henry Big Boy in .38/.357. The oldest grandson likes lever actions.

And head shots on Nazi Zombies...
 

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Woohoo !

No guns as gifts here - tractors, play-doh and clothes mostly.

And one robot...

There was screaming and running involved.
 

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IrishCop your grandson looks very proud of his new Henry. Walt, you are incorrigible! ;)
 

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That's some sweet rifle! No robots or screaming here. Not sure I want to know all the details bout that.....
We did some 3-wheeling in the National forest and couple hundred rounds of 223 to ward off any evil....demoncats ya know!
 

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Nice Henry Big Boy.

Ratfink2u said:
Nice Winchester indeed! Looks old? We went a shootin today as well here on the Orygun coast
The name "Henry" was taken from the precursor to the Winchester name. Benjamin Tyler Henry developed a rimfire .44 caliber lever action frontloader rifle in 1860 that looked sorta like that rifle. It had a brass colored receiver (really "gunmetal" an alloy made with brass) and this had no wood forend. A newer version made in 1866 introduced the wood forend and side loading gate, a hallmark of many lever action rifles, developed by Nelson King.
The modern Henry in Irishcop's photo is made by a company that took the Henry name but has no historical connection or lineage to Oliver Winchester's company.
But that doesn't mean they don't make good rifles -- they do, and many have that brass colored receiver and it does give that historical look to them.

I too picked up a new gun today ... new to me but not to this world; my sister gave me a 20 gauge Remington 870 LW that had been originally given to my father in 1984 when he retired from Union Carbide as a gift. I have a 12 gauge 870 but this has a nicer finish on the receiver, and of course, history. There's always history .... all kinds of history, brass receivers and family heirlooms. ;)
 

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Ah yes, the "yellow boy". Yeah, see them advertised all the time.
I took possession of my Grandpa's "Light Twelve" Browning pump but it's so pristine I'm reluctant to fire it...According to the serial number it's a 1957 production. It has beautiful engraving and the wood is flawless.....very sweet "hump-back" 12 gauge Belgium made rifle. Merry Christmas to me!
 

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This was under my tree. It doesn't have the compass in the stock or the thing that tells time, but I'm still pretty tickled.

Hope I don't put my eye out.

 

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A while back I had a question about a third generation black powder Colt I have. No one seemed to know the answer. Knowing that the Imperatos the owners of Henry Arms, were the makers of these revolvers I took a shot in the dark and emailed Henry Arms. In a couple of days I received a very polite answer to my inquiry. I was impressed that they would take the time and be so nice about it.
 

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This was under my tree. It doesn't have the compass in the stock or the thing that tells time, but I'm still pretty tickled.

Hope I don't put my eye out.

Nice rifle! So, what caliber is it? And is that a carbon fiber tube with steel barrel sleeved in, or just a really neat finish? Details, man! Details! :cryinlaugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
A while back I had a question about a third generation black powder Colt I have. No one seemed to know the answer. Knowing that the Imperatos the owners of Henry Arms, were the makers of these revolvers I took a shot in the dark and emailed Henry Arms. In a couple of days I received a very polite answer to my inquiry. I was impressed that they would take the time and be so nice about it.
That's nice to know, Bearcat. I've always been impressed with the Henry's I've seen at gun shops, and even with (I'll admit to it) the infomercials for Henry you see in the wee hours of the morning. Love that "Made in America or Not Made at All" slogan of theirs. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Nice Henry Big Boy.

The name "Henry" was taken from the precursor to the Winchester name. Benjamin Tyler Henry developed a rimfire .44 caliber lever action frontloader rifle in 1860 that looked sorta like that rifle. It had a brass colored receiver (really "gunmetal" an alloy made with brass) and this had no wood forend. A newer version made in 1866 introduced the wood forend and side loading gate, a hallmark of many lever action rifles, developed by Nelson King.
The modern Henry in Irishcop's photo is made by a company that took the Henry name but has no historical connection or lineage to Oliver Winchester's company.
But that doesn't mean they don't make good rifles -- they do, and many have that brass colored receiver and it does give that historical look to them.

I too picked up a new gun today ... new to me but not to this world; my sister gave me a 20 gauge Remington 870 LW that had been originally given to my father in 1984 when he retired from Union Carbide as a gift. I have a 12 gauge 870 but this has a nicer finish on the receiver, and of course, history. There's always history .... all kinds of history, brass receivers and family heirlooms. ;)
Tommy, thanks for the background on the Henry. And congratulations on on your taking possession of your dad's 870. I know how much that can mean.
 

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Terry, it's a Volquartsen SuperLite in .22LR. The SuperLite has an aluminum receiver and a small-diameter barrel with a carbon-fiber sleeve for rigidity, capped by a 32-hole compensator. (It's the rifle that was featured on Top Shot a while back.)

The scope is a Leopold Mark 4 10x40 that I had laying around. It just about doubles the weight of the rifle. I was wondering if it's too much scope for a .22, but I don't think so with this one. I was shooting Charlie's Volquartsen last week with a 10-power, and could easily make head shots on a steel prairie dog at 70 yards.
 

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Mike, that is just too cool.

As for the accuracy...well, "easily" is the operative word there. ��
 

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Nice rifle. Now someone please teach that boy some trigger disclipline.
I knew that was going to get some comments when I posted the picture. He's usually very good about that, but the excitement of Christmas morning must have over ridden his training.

Rest assured it was corrected.
 
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