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Discussion Starter #1
Folks,
I recently stumbled across an amazing Airplane the Bellanca Aircruiser!
Bellanca Aircruiser - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In the 1930's it could carry 4,000 lbs out of unimproved strips, the heavy duty bush plane of it's day. The performance isn't far from a current aircraft.

There was a really cheap cartoon series called "Clutch Cargo" in the 1960's and this airplane was featured.
Clutch Cargo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Serious surprising WOW!

Geoff
Who is amazed what he can find on the internet! :twisted:
 

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I remember Clutch Cargo, though I had no idea that the airplane he had was anything special. I really don't even remember it, even after seeing the picture in the Wiki article.
The series was produced using an incredibly limited animation technique by superimposing human actors' lips over the animated face as they spoke.
I also recall another series produced by the same film-makers; Space Angel. It used the same technique to depict the adventures of a a sort of Captain Kirk Wannabe who went on daring adventures in his spaceship, a typical 1950s "cigarshape" rocket with Cadillac tail fins.
That period in time (late 1950s through the mid 1960s) must have been a time of innovation amongst youth program film making; a British TV producer, Gerry Anderson, developed a technique called "Supermarionation." He did marionette based TV shows and the aforementioned technique refered to how the voices were synced to the puppets' mouths. The actors read their lines into a multichannel taperecorder, not unlike an old radio drama show. When the marioneters operated their respective puppets they controlled the feet, legs & body. One wire went into a solenoid inside the marionette which opened and closed the mouth. When the taped sound was played it was converted into a signal that operated the solenoid, thus operating th mouth, making it pretty easy to sync the audio, assuming all went well.
Gerry Anderson did shows like Supercar, Fireball XL5, Thunderbirds, Captain Scarlet and a few others during the 1960s that were pretty popular in America.
More recently, a movie was made of Thunderbirds using mostly CGI which didn't really do to well, and Captain Scarlet was reintroduced in CGI form in England... apparantly it did not do well enough to be picked up here .... or the Mysterons finally figured out how to kill him.
 

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I've known about the Bellanca Airbus/Aircruiser for several decades now.

Was a huge Clutch Cargo fan as a kid. Couple years ago, I bought both box sets of the DVDs, just to relive it. In a couple episodes, Clutch isn't flying his regular old faithful Bellanca, but one of these:

Noorduyn Norseman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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I missed all of this I think I was in Korea st the time this was on.
 

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Here's Clutch's Bellanca:

 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't know how this is going to space:
Spec
Engine
HP
Max Wt.
Empty Wt.
Est Load
Year Built
Cruise
Range

Bellanca
Wright R-1820 9 Cyl Radia
710 hp
10,000
6,072
3,928
1930
Est 122 Kt
608 mi

Cessna 206H Stationair
Lycoming IO-540 Flat-6 Piston
300 hp
3,600
2,176
1,424
1962
142 Kt
840 mi

Cessna 208 Caravan
P&W PT6A turboprop
677 hp
8,750
4,570
4,180
1984
171 kt
1,240 mi

It took 40+ years of tech and a whole new engine concept to catch up with Bellanca.
Geoff
Who notes the FAA hates single engine passenger A/C and limits them to 9 passengers vs. the Bellanca's 14.
 

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You'd think I would be more into airplanes after almost 20 years in the USAF. But when you pull Close-in-Sentry duties walking around aircraft for 8 to 12 hours at a time, it kinda dampens your enthusiasm...and in Georgia, it dampened your hair, uniform, socks...:D

But I was a HUGE fan of Clutch Cargo when I was a kid! Gosh, I hadn't though of that show in ages! I remember thinking, "Gosh...those look like real peoples mouths talking!"
 

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I watched the show a few times when I was a kid, but the human mouths on cartoon faces was off-putting to me. It was a neat idea, but just didn't appeal to me.
 

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I watched the show a few times when I was a kid, but the human mouths on cartoon faces was off-putting to me. It was a neat idea, but just didn't appeal to me.
The plots were goofy/stupid, too, even to a kid (well, to me at least)...but the airplanes and the music kept me coming back. ;)
 

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I just remember the mouths. It looked kinda gross, seen isolated from the rest of a real human face.
 

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The moving mouth on a still cartoon kind of weirded me out too, but I still watched.

Great info on the Bellanca, Geoff. Nice comparison to the Caravan.
 

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The moving mouth on a still cartoon kind of weirded me out too, but I still watched.

Great info on the Bellanca, Geoff. Nice comparison to the Caravan.
Well, back in The Day, there weren't many TV options--two, and only if the weather was nice...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The Model is serious cool not to mention the difficulty of working in 1/72 scale. That is tiny, well except for the museum quality B-52 Model.
Geoff
Who remembers how small the 1/72 hard plastic models were to work back in the day.
 

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The Model is serious cool not to mention the difficulty of working in 1/72 scale. That is tiny, well except for the museum quality B-52 Model.
Geoff
Who remembers how small the 1/72 hard plastic models were to work back in the day.
Young eyes, young fingers...
 

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Can anybody with a better knowledge of aerodynamics than me (which would be just about everyone) tell me whether the bottom "wing" adds any lift, or is it just support for the top wing?
 

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Can anybody with a better knowledge of aerodynamics than me (which would be just about everyone) tell me whether the bottom "wing" adds any lift, or is it just support for the top wing?
Both, theoretically. That was a big Bellanca deal at the time--I think they were called "lifting struts" or something of the sort.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I wonder if anyone ever put a model of this Bellanca into a modern wind tunnel and determined if there was any gain in aerodynamics from interaction between the angled wing and the main wing.

Geoff
Who remembers the modern bi-plane the US experimented back in the 90s...Burt Rutan? Scaled Dynamics?
 
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