Gun Hub Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,172 Posts
I really need to read some of his stuff. Lord Knows I've enjoyed enough movies and TV shows based on his stuff over the decades.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
I agree completely with all of your praise for the late Mr. Leonard. While I wasn't the biggest fan of his on the planet (I think an old partner of mine was that), I enjoyed his work and I always appreciated his talent and abilities as a writer in several areas.

I chime in here not to hijack this thread (in fact, I waited until its activity appeared to have tapered off) but because I assumed that most of you who commented earlier might also be interested to know that a journeyman film and (early) TV director who died on the same day as Mr. Leonard, might also have been someone whose work you respected.

Ted Post passed away on August 20th 2013 at the age of 95.

Mr. Post is nowhere near as well known (and to be honest probably not anywhere near as talented) as such contemporaries of his as John Sturges (now dead for over 20 years) and John Frankenheimer (dead for over 10) but if you have contributed to this site, then more than likely, you have also seen his work.

People never watched the credits much when he occasionally held the reins on such television shows as Medic (with Richard Boone), gun enthusiast Erle Stanley Gardner's Perry Mason, Richard Diamond (with a pre-Fugitive David Janssen), The Rifleman (that featured the talents of just about every action writer and director of the period), Sam Peckinpah's own The Westerner (with Brian Keith), Wagon Train, The Virginian, Gunsmoke, (prophetically) Rawhide, Combat, Boris Karloff's Thriller, Rod Serling's Twilight Zone, and more others than I can remember.

And while he made some pretty schlocky Made-for-TV movies in the 70's and 80's when such things were in vogue (hey, a guy's gotta eat), he also directed Clint Eastwood's return to the American Western: Hang 'Em High in 1968 (a film that was also the first release from Eastwood's long running Malpaso Production Company), Eastwood's return to Dirty Harry in Magnum Force in 1973 (although it probably also ended the two's friendship), and the rarely seen but very worth seeing Go Tell The Spartans with Burt Lancaster in 1978.

Just thought you might like to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
Go tell the Spartans was a very good movie about the early days of US involvement in Vietnam. It's too bad more people don't know about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,543 Posts
GTTS was a great movie about the early days of 'Nam. It's probably a great pity that you had to have some background to be able to appreciate many parts of it, especially the details. Speaking of which, I wonder where they found that helo?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,172 Posts
I recognized the name--probably from Hang 'Em High.

Saw Go Tell the Spartans in the late '70s on HBO. It ran about the same time as another little-known VN war flick, The Boys in Company C.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,627 Posts
I had just finished watching the first three "Dirty Harry" movies last night*, so I recognized the name, and realized that I had seen him listed as director on several old TV shows from when I was growing up.

With Elmore Leonard I'm like Snake, though. Seen and liked a lot of movies based on his writing, but have never read any myself.

*I know, I know, not exactly Academy Award material, but the wife is working nights this weekend, so a mini "Harry" marathon seemed right. And I'll admit it, I like them! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
I had just finished watching the first three "Dirty Harry" movies last night*, so I recognized the name, and realized that I had seen him listed as director on several old TV shows from when I was growing up.

With Elmore Leonard I'm like Snake, though. Seen and liked a lot of movies based on his writing, but have never read any myself.

*I know, I know, not exactly Academy Award material, but the wife is working nights this weekend, so a mini "Harry" marathon seemed right. And I'll admit it, I like them! :)
Hey IC, nothing wrong with that. My wife was a Deputy in the jail her first 10 years in L/E and worked nights too, I worked swings on patrol so I
d do the same thing. Band of brothers and Tombstone got wore out. Seriously, I went through 3 copies of Tombstone before it came out in DVD.
Love the "Dirty Harry" series as well.
I didn't read any of Mr. Leonard/s books, but it sounds like another loss for American literature.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top