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Mass times velocity squared divided by 450400.

Mass equals the bullet weight. using a 230 grain 45 ACP bullet.

Say that the velocity of this bullet is 850 feet per second.

So 230x850x850=166175000
You then divide 166175000 by 450400 and get 368.9498 or
basically 369 foot pounds of energy for this round. You can use this equation for any caliber, bullet weight or velocity to find foot pounds of energy for any given round. This is an algebraic equation that I have tried to make simple so that any one can use it. I took this off Remingtons web page about a year ago.
Examples of the use of this equation.
38 Special 158 grain bullet at 870 fps 265 foot pounds
9mm 124 grain bullet at 1200 fps 396 foot pounds
40S&W 135 grain bullet at 1300 fps 507 foot pounds
45acp 185 grain bullet at 1025 fps 432 foot pounds
45 acp 165 grain bullet at 1250 fps 572 foot pounds
45 super 230 grain bullet at 1200 fps 735 foot pounds
357 magnum 124 grain bullet at 1668fps 766 foot pounds
10mm 135 grain bullet at 1600 fps 767 foot pounds
40 super 200 grain bullet at 1300 fps 750 foot pounds
41 magnum 220 grain bullet at 1563 fps 1193 foot pound
460 rowland 185 grain bullet at 1553 fps 991 foot pounds
44 magnum 240 grain bullet at 1560 fps 1297 foot pounds
44 magnum 240 grain bullet at 1640 fps 1433 foot pounds
50 AE 300 grain bullet at 1200 fps 959 foot pounds
These are all examples of how bullet weight and velocity can give you the foot pounds of energy of each round. This equation works at the point from the muzzle when the bullet in question is chronographed. All of the ammunition companies in the world use this simple equation.
 

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:) "Mass times velocity squared divided by 450400."

It would have been more clear to have said "Weight in grains times"....

"Mass" is a specific term; it's the weight in pounds divided by the acceleration due to gravity. Or, m = w/g. This number, then, is "poundals". (Which I always thought of as a weird term--but that's Physics-folks for ya.)

Which all goes in the FWIW closet of technical accuracy.

:), Art
 
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