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Have one, no I didn't buy it one of my smart a......lec friends gave it to me, the blade is sharp. Limited usefulness but good for the shock and awe factor.
 

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Wonder what took so long. Something very much like that was on the cover of handgunner 10-15 years ago.

Now instead of shooting oneself when holstering the good news is that stab wounds in the leg are easier to treat than gunshots... :roll:
 

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bearcat6 said:
Rather interestingly, the LaserLyte/KA-BAR device has been around for a while. People seem to be selling it all over the place but I don't know how well they're doing in those efforts.

I'm sure that everybody here knows this but the Brits offered a bayonet for their service revolvers in the Great War. There is enough interest in them that at some point, somebody actually tooled up to make high-end reproductions. Atlanta Cutlery is still offering them at: http://www.atlantacutlery.com/p-1564-pr ... ction.aspx

And looking to our neighbors in Eastern Europe, this toy is being offered from CZ itself for use on one of their service pistols: https://shop.cz-usa.com/images/items/zoom/11900.jpg

As bizarre as that idea might be, the execution of this concept by Ceska zbrojovka is certainly interesting. The "mount" fits on to the front end of the pistol and provides an extended lower rail surface that is visible in the picture. Not so visible, however, are the forward reaching teeth that surround the muzzle that are also integral to the mount. Finally, the "bayonet" is detachable through the use of a cross button (not "bayonet" Hah!) lock.

I am told that while the blade resembles a somewhat traditional bayonet, it was designed for use in addressing vehicles, in that its point could be driven into its glass, not only for the purposes of shattering it, but more in an attempt to stabilize the gun at a fixed point and distance before the shot is made into it. Sort of like a fixed standoff device, I guess.

The teeth might help with the shattering of certain glass-types but I would almost have to think that they were designed (like the crenulated bezel on some flashlights) to be used against people and not the cars they drive. Although looking at the market this accessory was originally designed for, I wouldn't be surprised if the bayonet blade was used in that matter too.

I used to go to Europe a lot and I always found it interesting that while our own press condemns us for our civilian gun-oriented culture and for our law enforcing agencies handling of demonstrators and unruly crowds, they routinely overlook amazing things along those same lines "over there". In my travels I saw guns made for handling crowds: special-order, factory Ruger Mini-14's with extremely course Checkering for "rasping" the flesh of the uncooperative and a rounded Op Rod that could be cycled but that wouldn't stick in the heads or chests of those struck or "pushed back" with a gun carried at Port Arms, and the first Switchable Bennelli's Shotguns that worked as a pump with low energy, chemical agent, anti-personnel, or less lethal rounds but worked as a semi-auto when it was decided that "real" shots needed to be taken at those same individuals both come to mind. And I also saw devices and techniques employed against people that not only would have raised eyebrows in this country but would have gotten the people who employed them indicted by our federal government for doing so.

As such, a factory-bayoneted CZ pistol doesn't seem out of place one bit.

Between lights, lasers and now bayonets, I figure the next step will either be a saw blade to allow one to "cut thru" rather than "shoot around" a barricade, a magnifying glass that can be swung into place so that our aging eyes can better see the front sight, or maybe a fishhook and line to better parallel the lead sinker/boat anchor characteristics of some of the guns it could be attached to.
 

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wouldn't it be easier to just get a bigger gun to shoot through obstacles like trees and walls... saw blades are so primitive... :?
 

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Will this work?


Imagine it on an AR pistol...staying relevant to handguns... :ek:
 

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shep854 said:
Will this work?


Imagine it on an AR pistol...staying relevant to handguns... :ek:
Looks like something from a Tarantino movie...starring Bruce Campbell.... :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I used to wonder about the same thing as Mr. Marlowe with respect to the media fawning over the more highly "civilized" European police forces and handling of firearms policy in general. This was much more prevelent 30 odd years ago than it is today. I expect it was due to selective memory back when, many not (or refusing to) recognize that the local beat cop carried a sub-gun.

Quite possibly the change was due to a wider exposure to what happens in the rest of the world. Interaction with non English speaking paramilitary cops at checkpoints can significantly change ones viewpoints, especially if one began the encounter with an exalted opinion of one's own station in life and the entitlements that go with that.
 

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Re:

William R. Moore said:
I used to wonder about the same thing as Mr. Marlowe with respect to the media fawning over the more highly "civilized" European police forces and handling of firearms policy in general. This was much more prevelent 30 odd years ago than it is today. I expect it was due to selective memory back when, many not (or refusing to) recognize that the local beat cop carried a sub-gun.

Quite possibly the change was due to a wider exposure to what happens in the rest of the world. Interaction with non English speaking paramilitary cops at checkpoints can significantly change ones viewpoints, especially if one began the encounter with an exalted opinion of one's own station in life and the entitlements that go with that.
Mr. Moore:

Your points are very well taken and remind me of a few more things that I observed first hand over the years.

I was in one country where certain factions of the national police force were not especially well liked. The people I was with had arranged for a visit for me with the head of some technical branch within that agency. This division was headquartered in a wonderfully ornate old complex in the middle of one of the country's largest and best known cities and I was told that they shared the location with a similar group from the military (that should tell you something right there) so we might meet with them too.

Looking out the car window at the world going by as we worked our way deeper and deeper into this heavily urbanized setting, I noticed that the "beat cops" evolved into something more as we got closer to the government facility. Initially, they were dressed (albeit more ornately) as such officers are in this country: standard (traditional) uniforms and sidearms worn on a duty belt. Then the sidearms were supplemented by 9mm subguns slung not over their shoulders but across their chests were they could be more readily employed if need be.

Next (and remember we were still travelling thru a "neighborhood" and not a manufacturing or business district), the uniforms became a bit more para-militaristic and soft armor was noticeable outside the body; something not uncommon for Europe at the time. Ultimately, the soft armor was replaced with hard armor and guns with similar actions and controls but chambering rifle rounds replaced the 9's.

The number of "officers" increased in proportion to their levels of preparedness. While at first there were more "walking and talking" officers in a given space than we might see in many places here (where vehicle-borne officers are generally more common), they were still relatively few and far between. Then, there were more of them. Then, there were a lot more of them. And then, they were everywhere. Amusingly, when we finally entered the courtyard leading into the property, we pulled up to one gate, another slid shut behind us and an entire group of these heavily armed (and heavily armored) people swarmed around the big Mercedes I was in, running mirrors under the vehicle, peering inside, and, while they knew everybody in the car but me, asking all of us for "our papers".

It's sad but these days we seem to moving way too much in that direction ourselves. And not in regard to the "papers" part that the press and politicians seem so quick to talk about but the gun and the armor part instead. More cops everywhere are wearing their soft armor outside their uniforms (they call it concealable for a reason) and everybody seems to feel that if they don't carry an M4 in the course of their daily activities (they call them "duties" for a reason), they will be outgunned.

Worse yet are our airports (and in some parts of the US, the major train stations), where shoulder-fired weapons have become common and dogs are routinely employed in the walk-around functions of these security personnel. Such sights were always common in Europe but now we have to live with them here. Personally, I think the guns are not only out of place (especially on the other side of the security checkpoints and within those sides of the terminals themselves) but are of the wrong type and caliber for such locations. And the dogs (not always of the sniffing-as-detecting type) conjure up certain political and social issues that are outside the scope of this section within this site.

But when it comes to the "checkpoints" you mention, the most entertaining thing I ever observed was not in Europe but in the Middle East and not out on the roadway but in a country where the youth of the nation was routinely conscripted at a relatively early age to work in many different job roles. I was flying back to Germany from a several day visit and had gotten to the airport early. Sitting there for a while, catching up on some report writing, the first thing I noticed were not only the patrolling "uniform" officers but the plainclothes personnel, who would routinely slink by and look into the waste bins and garbage cans on a regular basis; trying to be cool but still looking for bombs among the refuse.

But the best thing was the lines that were formed in order to access the airport/boarding area proper. There were a bunch of them, each with a series of long tables and each "manned" by a uniformed young woman who looked more like she should be in high school than asking questions of foreigners and pawing thru their luggage.

Who was I? Who did I work for? Who did I visit? Did I have proof of those visits? Did I have proof of who I worked for? Did I have proof of who I was? Some of these things were tiresome. Some were intrusive. But all of them required answers. Polite answers. I used to ask people stuff when I was on the job so I knew how the game was played. Unfortunately for the man in the line next to me, he didn't. I could tell he was growing impatient with the entire process and seemed annoyed with the fact that he (whoever he was) was not being treated in a manner to which he had obviously grown accustomed.

I was just finishing up and the girl who had been questioning me, was in the process of thanking me for my cooperation and handing me back all of my stuff, when I heard him say something less-than-polite to the girl who was dealing with him. So she gathered up all of his identifying materials, signaled someone to come help scoop up all of his belongings and with the additional "help" of several others who appeared as if by magic, they escorted my fellow traveler elsewhere within the building. Needless to say, he didn't make the flight. Whether he learned his lesson or not, I'll never know.

Live and learn; that's my motto. But not necessarily everybody else's.
 

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I'm afraid that the various measures taken by the appointed security politicians, and the cubicle creatures who serve them, are more in the line of doing something to make the citizenry feel secure rather than actually improving security. As our management used to say: "Perception is reality". They quit using the phrase after we turned it around and beat them bloody with it. Unfortunately, the habit seems an inate government, if not human, trait.

I've tried to stay away from airports and other public forms of transportation since 9/11. I do recall critiquing a search at Dallas/Fort Worth. It seemed most redundant, the young lady's clothing hid nothing!
 

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jdh said:
Have one, no I didn't buy it one of my smart a......lec friends gave it to me, the blade is sharp. Limited usefulness but good for the shock and awe factor.
Yeah, shock and awe the jury straight to a conviction!

Geoff
Who is paranoid, don't worry, it's a professional requirement.
 

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Skeptic49 said:
jdh said:
Have one, no I didn't buy it one of my smart a......lec friends gave it to me, the blade is sharp. Limited usefulness but good for the shock and awe factor.
Yeah, shock and awe the jury straight to a conviction!

Geoff
Who is paranoid, don't worry, it's a professional requirement.
Conviction for what?
Do I need to put a smilie after every tongue-in-cheek comment for the sarcasm challenged?
 

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Deleted for mindless blather. :roll:
 

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Significant Other has been having a ball with the LaserLyte bayonet on her Glocks and XDms. They're FUN, dammit...

They're also of potential use to firearms instructors. I can think of no better corrective equipment to cure the student who has watched too many gangsta rap videos from shoving the pistol down the front of his waistband...
 

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Mas Ayoob said:
... I can think of no better corrective equipment to cure the student who has watched too many gangsta rap videos from shoving the pistol down the front of his waistband...
Yeah ... that would be a good way to make the point. :shocked: :lol: :bolt: :cryinlaugh:
 

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I thjnk there is a touch of poetic justice when that happens.

Had a call one night when one of our finest citizens stuffed his new blaster down the front of his pants without removing his finger from the trigger. It was not a pretty sight and very hard to maintain the proper decorum... :rotflmao:
 
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