Gun Hub Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,173 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In 1976 I got a call from a friend who was handling the guns for an estate sale. He read me a long list of cool stuff but the only two things I was interested in that I could afford were a Beretta 948 (.22LR version of the Model 1934) and a "reblued" .22 PPK. Price was $125 each and I bought them both. The Beretta came in its factory box and was in pretty nice shape, but the PPK was kind of a mess.

From the slide shape, it was obviously an early one. (I'd always assumed it was WWII era but according to the sticky on this site, its SN, 850XXX, puts it at 1935!) It had obviously been somebody's "project gun." ALL markings except the SN had been removed from both frame and slide in the polishing job, and the thing came with a homemade one-piece wooden grip featuring somewhat crude home checkering.

On the plus side, it was a real PPK, it was cheap, and it turned out to function just fine.

I shot it occasionally over the years but not much because the tiny, nonadjustable sights didn't look where the bullets actually went. At some point in the '90s, I dropped the hammer using the safety/decocker, which broke the safety right in half. :evil: I started looking for a replacement safety and found that one in .22 would cost me a bit more than the whole gun originally had. :evil:

Several years ago at a gun show there was a guy who was selling all sorts of gun parts and "kits" (basically, complete guns without frames--always kinda wondered what the story was there) and he had a postwar, Interarms .22 PPK slide complete for $165. Sounded like a bargain to me after being quoted almost that much for the safety alone! I paid the price and was delighted to find that it fit my little Frankengun perfectly and functioned just fine. Now I had a nice-looking postwar-type slide with working safety and better sights in the bargain.

Over the years I managed to pick up several different sets of grips for it. First came a set of commercial wooden checkered Siles that weren't bad, but I always wanted the mottled brown plastic ones. Next I found a set of white plastics, then black plastics, then FINALLY just a couple years ago, the brown ones I'd been seeking.

No, my little Frankengun doesn't have any collector value, but it looks like a PPK, shoots like a PPK, and I have a lot of fun with it. And I prolly only have about one-half to one-third in it what a typical .22 PPK would cost. What's not to like? :wink:



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Snake;
About your experiences with that Walther...
You wrote: "...I dropped the hammer using the safety/decocker, which broke the safety right in half."
I have heard of such things happening in WW2-issue P.38s, due to hurried and sub-standard heat treatment and other things, but never in an early Walther of any kind. One might imagine that a 1935-vintage Walther would've been made of the beat materials, worked in the finest ways.
Have you any thoughts about whether the broken safety was original, or a replacement by some previous owner? Did the metal show crystallization at the fracture, as a WW2-vintage safety might? Anything else?

This is a good lesson to newcomers, about the reliability of safeties in general, and decocker safeties in particular, to wit:
• Don't ever rely completely on a mechanical safety device.
• If doing something drops the hammer, it had better be pointing in a truly safe direction before you do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,678 Posts
Snake45 said:
...always kinda wondered what the story was there.
I can take a very educated guess…

When a gun is recovered from a crime scene, one of two things happens to it:

1- It's sold off to a licensed dealer, who then re-sells the pistol
2- The gun is destroyed

Generally it's the very small towns that opt for #1 and most big cities opt for #2. Here's the way #2 often works.

I'm a dealer who wants the parts off of those guns, so I place a bid on the entire lot of firearms. My bid is for parts and a part of that bid is the agreement that the frames (legally, the gun) of those firearms are destroyed in compliance with ATF rules (generally means torch cut into 4 pieces). Since torch cutting every frame can be time consuming, most just drop the frame into the smelter. So here's the source of a lot of parts on the market, and if I had to guess, I'd say that's how the seller got your parts kit for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,804 Posts
Kevin is very probably correct, I spent one hectic friday stripping about 80 guns for parts, the day before the whole lot was dropped into a smelter and made into a "peace sculpture" what ever the heck that is.....there were nearly 400 guns from a metro PD, of that, most were pot metal or nothing anyone would want parts for, but there were several good guns in there. Mauser HsC's, a few Beretta's and quite a few Colts and Smiths. I would love to say that some were grabbed, but alas, we had a real bee atch of a PD politician watching everything....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,173 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Kevin Gibson said:
Snake45 said:
...always kinda wondered what the story was there.
I can take a very educated guess…

When a gun is recovered from a crime scene, one of two things happens to it:

1- It's sold off to a licensed dealer, who then re-sells the pistol
2- The gun is destroyed

Generally it's the very small towns that opt for #1 and most big cities opt for #2. Here's the way #2 often works.

I'm a dealer who wants the parts off of those guns, so I place a bid on the entire lot of firearms. My bid is for parts and a part of that bid is the agreement that the frames (legally, the gun) of those firearms are destroyed in compliance with ATF rules (generally means torch cut into 4 pieces). Since torch cutting every frame can be time consuming, most just drop the frame into the smelter. So here's the source of a lot of parts on the market, and if I had to guess, I'd say that's how the seller got your parts kit for you.
I figured as much. The only other explanation is that the guy was providing a market for stolen guns, which he'd then strip for parts. But he had too many and was operating too openly for that to be likely.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top