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I have a old U.S gold coin. Based on its condition I found its coin value. But based on its gold weight, its almost double the coin value. Is it obvious that I should sell it for the most gold value or just consider it an old coin and price accordingly ?
 

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Casual,

fwiw, my GUESS (& that is what it is: a SWAG!) is that gold will go to 3K an ounce & perhaps 3500. - in the unlikely event that BHO wins re-election i wouldn't be surprized to see 6,000 bucks an ounce.
(otoh, almost nobody will have 2 shiney dimes to run together in that event, so the price will mean little! - can you say, "Barter economy, children?" -"SURE you can!")

so i wouldn't sell it now, period. - i'm selling NOTHING that is"easily convertible" into things that are needful, like FOOD for example.
(i believe that even .22LR ammo & shotshells will be excellent items for barter!)

to all: I HOPE TO H*LL that i'm 100% WRONG about the next few years, but i fear that i'm correct, so i'm preparing as best i can.

yours, sw
 

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Collector prices are probably lagging well behind the quickly rising "junk gold" price-by-weight.
A "collector's coin" would be worth its weight in gold, plus a premium for being a collectible coin.

The best strategy would be to take it to a stamp-and-coin shop, and see what they offer you. But don't sell it yet.
 

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Collector prices are probably lagging well behind the quickly rising "junk gold" price-by-weight.
A "collector's coin" would be worth its weight in gold, plus a premium for being a collectible coin.
The premium is determined by grade and mintage. Rare coins in a high grade command high prices. An 1893-S Morgan in AU50 will fetch six figures at auction. An 1878-S Morgan in AU50 is worth its weight in silver plus a couple of dollars but an 1878-S Morgan in MS68 will fetch substantially more.

If the coin is circulated then it's worth it's melt value unless it is rare. Casual, You can look up some mintage info at CoinFacts.com - The Internet Encyclopedia of U.S. Coins.
 
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