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Just saw the Greek Golden Glock. I was wondering about the dingus on the rear of the slide, and the model number on the slide said "18", which rang a faint bell.

That's not an aftermaket safety, as I first guessed. It's a selector switch... the Glock 18 is capable of *Full Automatic* fire.

Glock never marketed it here in the States, for some reason... :shock:
 

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igli said:
...the Glock 18 is capable of *Full Automatic* fire.
Glock never marketed it here in the States, for some reason... :shock:
The 1986 ban on manufacture and importation of machine guns left only those guns already here available to the common citizen. Whether any of the Glocks were imported before the ban, I'm not sure. There are some in the hands of dealers as "samples", which can only be sold to law enforcement agencies.

The Glock 18's were marketed to law enforcement. The Knox County (TN) Sheriff's SWAT unit, among others, carried the pistol, even after the rest of the department switched to .40 caliber Glocks. The pistols have a very high rate of fire. A well-trained user can routinely place 3-5 rounds in an 8" circle at 7 yards, in rapidly repeatable bursts.
 

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Naturally, after 19 May 1986, the Models 18 Glock machine pistols are "Law Enforcement Only" ordnance… Chuck Karwan told me a decade or so ago that they were a popular "entry gun" with one of the Warrants Squads in a jurisdiction near his home in Oregon.

Wanna see one in action? http://www.thegunzone.com/video/glock1.avi. Watch the times carefully; the standard HighCap is dumped in well under two (2!) seconds, while the 33-rounder is burned off in somewhere less than three seconds.

And if you look carefully on TGZ's Glock directory page, you'll note a link to a "homemade" Glock machine pistol as well. The guy does a pretty good job of controlling his fire.
 
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