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Discussion Starter #1
An LEO in a neighboring state came across this in the possession of a convicted felon. It was confiscated and an alert sent out to warn other LEO's to be on the lookout for devices such as these.

The photo and description were part of the BOLO.

I though it was neat because I didn't realize that the Gryrojet technology was ever used for this purpose.

gyro flare.jpg

"Gyrojet Flare Launcher
The Gyrojet principle was also examined for use in survival flare guns, and a similar idea was explored for a grenade launcher. The emergency-survival flare version (A/P25S-5A) was used for many years as a standard USAF issue item in survival kits, vests, and for forward operations signaling, with flares available in white, green, blue, and red. Known as the gyrojet flare, the A/P25S-5A came with a bandolier of seven flares and had an effective altitude of over 1,500 feet (460 metres). Its rounded-nose projectile was designed to ricochet through trees and clear an over canopy of branches.
The Gyrojet is a family of unique firearms developed in the 1960s named for the method of gyroscopically stabilizing its projectiles. Rather than inert bullets, Gyrojets fire small rockets called Microjets which have little recoil and do not require a heavy barrel to resist the pressure of the combustion gases. Velocity on leaving the tube was very low, but increased to around 1,250 feet per second (380 m/s) at 30 feet (9.1 m). The result is a very lightweight weapon.[1]


The inherent difference between a conventional firearm and a rocket is that the projectile of a conventional firearm builds up to its maximum speed in the barrel of the firearm, then slows down over its trajectory; the rocket continues to accelerate as long as the fuel burns, then continues its flight like an un-powered bullet. A bullet has maximum kinetic energy at the muzzle; a rocket has maximum kinetic energy immediately after its fuel is expended. The burn time for a Gyrojet rocket has been reported as 1/10 of a second"
 

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Way cool - I've wanted one of those since I saw one in a James Bond movie.
 

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When I left the Air Force, one of these kits left with me. For the next few Fourths of July, I would treat the friends and family to a little pyrotechnic "survival exercise".

Frankly, I wasn't too impressed. In daylight, no friendly pilots would have been able to see it; at night, it would have been possible, but every bad guy in the zip code would also see it. It would probably have been best for use in a life raft at night. I'm seriously skeptical about the 1500' altitude...I would have guessed about half that.

Still, as long as your life wasn't depending on it, it was quite a crowd pleaser.
 

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I always heard them called 'pencil flares'. I have the launcher, picked up at a surplus store to go into my flight kit, but sadly, the flares were dead.
IIRC, in a combat setting, they were only used to help guide the final approach of the rescue helo.
Navy aircrew, at least, were also issued .38 tracer for signalling; for many, this was the only purpose for the revolver.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Back in the eighties when we (Security Police) were out playing grunts, training in Air Base Ground Defense, I got to play with slap flares. Disposable , one time use things, they were pretty cool. I really liked the Ground Burst Simulators...supposedly equal to a third of a stick of dynamite, they made a pretty good little blast.

Unfortunately, they kept a pretty good count of those. No "free samples" available.
 

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Looks like some yahoo killed himself with Tannerite here. Very sketchy details in the local fishwrapper.
 

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There was a video on a gun blog of a man blowing up a barn with Tannerite.
 

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Funny how thing follow us home some time. Those I remember were from survival kits and the flare was loaded into something that looked like a .38 Spec. aluminum case.

I never thought of trying a real cartridge but without some chamber support I doubt that it would have much power.
 

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As I recall H&K had a similar flare launcher. Some folks wondered about using it as a personal defense tool. No joy too inaccurate description of target area, UP!
Geoff
Who wonders what ever happened to the Gyrojet design team. Those little self launching flechettes would make a great weapon for light drones.
 

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Funny how thing follow us home some time. Those I remember were from survival kits and the flare was loaded into something that looked like a .38 Spec. aluminum case.

I never thought of trying a real cartridge but without some chamber support I doubt that it would have much power.
WHOA!!! To clarify, the .38 tracers were for the pilots' revolvers, NOT the flare launcher...:eek:
 

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When I was there the USAF did test the Gyrojet pistol and went no further. I saw the gun but never fired it.

One of the guys who did said there wasn't much muzzle velocity and you could probably stop it at the muzzle if not for the fire.

Just recently the NRA "Gun Gurus" tv show did shoot one and it was singularly unremarkable.

I also was told the USAF tested the Dardick Gun. Never saw if, but did get one "Tround".
 

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I also was told the USAF tested the Dardick Gun. Never saw if, but did get one "Tround".
During the 1960s, TRW created a Gatling-type weapon based on the Dardick open-chamber concept: the HIVAP (High Velocity All Purpose). The HIVAP trounds used Lexan cases loaded with .31 caliber saboted flechette. The really wild part was the cyclic rate: just shy of 30,000 rpm. TRW's Don Stoehr claimed that the twin feeders could support 42,000 rpm and that a switch to electrical priming would allow them to double the existing cyclic rate. However, I don't know how they ever expected to keep such a monster fed. The weapon pods that TRW was designing only held 3,000 to 6,000 trounds.

Oddly enough, the Dardick family is still pushing the open-chamber/tround concept, and has even filed for a new patent.
 

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During the 1960s, TRW created a Gatling-type weapon based on the Dardick open-chamber concept: the HIVAP (High Velocity All Purpose). The HIVAP trounds used Lexan cases loaded with .31 caliber saboted flechette. The really wild part was the cyclic rate: just shy of 30,000 rpm. TRW's Don Stoehr claimed that the twin feeders could support 42,000 rpm and that a switch to electrical priming would allow them to double the existing cyclic rate. However, I don't know how they ever expected to keep such a monster fed. The weapon pods that TRW was designing only held 3,000 to 6,000 trounds.

Oddly enough, the Dardick family is still pushing the open-chamber/tround concept, and has even filed for a new patent.
Take THAT,MetalStorm!! :p
 
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