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Walnut or Birch (see Pics)

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so which one do you like better? See pics below






So what do you think?
George

p.s. sorry for taking up so much space
 

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George,

They both look like mighty fine stocks to me! I am partial to walnut stocks though so I would lean towards that a little more. I would take the one in the best condition, if all else being equal (price, dings, etc.)
 

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birch... my birch stock is about that color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone for all the coments. I am leaning to the birch because of the tight fit, I love the walnut for the look, but it is loose as a goose.when the rifle is in the birch and I take out the trigger group, I have to pound on the stock to get it off the rifle. with the walnut, the second I take the trigger group out the stock falls off of the rifle. anyways thanks for the comments
George
 

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:eek: Both birch and walnut are soft, hardwoods. I like the warmer, darker look of the walnut, but both ding up really easily. If I had my preferance for gunstock wood, give me rockhard maple all the way baby! 8) :wink:
 

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Of the two, I loved the birch and really liked the walnut. Since the Birch fit so well, to me it's a no brainer!! :eek: :D
 

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My M1A Mod 9103 came with Birch. A nice thick stock with a very good lock up. I ordered a like new Walnut from Freds and have been using that stock lately. The walnut is slimmer (requested from Fred) and feels better to my hands . Lock up on the Walnut is super tight. I like the look of Walnut on my service rifles although Birch is said to be 20% stronger. Keep them both and have a little varity. HTH, Dan
 
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As beautiful as they are I'd say:

Neither. Fiberglas is superior to both for resisting warpage in temperature variables. While I'm a man who appreciates both beautiful rifles and beautiful women, I've lived long enough to know that beauty does not equal happiness nor utility. Give me homely and accurate.
 

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I'm usually a walnut kind of guy but the birch in your pictures look pretty damn slick. I voted for the birch. Dutchman does have a point though....my M3A isn't wood but it'll get the job done and then some.
 

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stocks

here is the skinny on stocks

walnut- started out with
birch 20% stronger than walnut, much tigher fit and thus accuracy is improved.....
Big Red these are slightly larger birch stocks, they have a red tone to them... I agree with fred of freds m14 stocks these are the best non synthetic stock

synthetics- not as pretty as the wood but can take conditions that would do the wood in... very accurate also very easy to camo

thanks to freds site... FredsM14stocks.com
 

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Hmm where do I start.

A tree with tight growth rings is more stable and "typically" stronger.

Both Birch and Walnut are utilized for for hardwood floors! Birch cost less because it grows faster (can be harvested sooner than Walnut) hence larger growth rings. (and is used for tooth picks). Birch is also used for snow shoes (white ash too..... amongst others) very flexible.

If you are really really concerned about strength than check the growth rings. It may help you make your mind up. (THE TIGHTER THE GROWTH RINGS ARE THE MORE STABLE THE WOOD IS)

Personally, if I was going into battle or shooting competetivly I would pick Walnut.

Birch on the other hand looks awsome, is also quite durable, lighter, and I doubt that you would really notice difference in accuracy.

I hope I did not answer your question.....just gave you more information to make an informed decsion. ( now if I can only learn to spell)

If you do a seach for "fine woodworking" or the like you should be able to get some great info on finishing.

Oh yea......... the "red tone or hughe" is caused by linseed oil. I used (applied) mineral spirits to the stock....let it dry....sanded with 150 or better sandpaper and applied tung oil. Again when you do your search it will give you formulas for mixing tung oil for the best finish... yaada yaada yaada...... Its really late for me..... sorry for the typo's etc.....

SMITH
 

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Walnut. Walnut with the least amount of stripe.
This will give you the most durable stock, maybe
not the most eye appealing, just the toughest.
The more stripes you see, the more weak spots you have.
 
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