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Discussion Starter #1
I washed my reload today, 6 rds. in a speedstrip left in my Eotac jeans.

On the down side, I was a bit embarrassed.

On the up side, the rds. are now quite shiny... :)
 

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Let us know if they fire normally. This should be interesting.
 

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Or, you could spray them with clear acrylic, and have a "presentation" set. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Snake45 said:
Let us know if they fire normally. This should be interesting.
I'll bet they work just fine.

We'll find out next weekend... :)
 

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I washed my brand new money clip the other day, a grand in cash and three credit cards, Talik about money laundrying. I'll bet the ammo works just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Charlie Petty said:
hot water or cold?
I don't know the details, the laundry is not normally my duty station... 8)

I think I'll just pull the trigger and see what happens.
 

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I can see it now, Charlie's next article... not only the best ammo for your gun but the best laundry detergent to use on that ammo. Are you gonna need test shooters?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
SpecialEd said:
I can see it now, Charlie's next article... not only the best ammo for your gun but the best laundry detergent to use on that ammo. Are you gonna need test shooters?
Please, don't give him any ideas... 8)
 

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Haven't I read that you shouldn't tumble live ammo, because it can break or otherwise physically alter the size/shapes of the powder granules, changing its burning characteristics? Might the washing and/or drying cycles do the same thing?

I guess Walt will tell us tomorrow. :wink:
 

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I have read that you shouldn't tumble loaded ammo, but I have done it several times for various reasons and I have been unable to tell any difference between it and untumbled ammo.
 

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There have been more than a few reports of problems with tumbling loaded ammo the most serious being in rifle cartridges loaded with stick powders for there is a real possibility of pulverizing the grains and creating Bullseye...


I also know that some folks routinely tumble handgun rounds to get rid of lube but I don't like the idea. I have never quite been able to understand the loader who obsesses that his ammo must be just as shiny as factory new. There is no functional advantage and all you do is dirty it up when you shoot it...

I do tumble brass before loading but if there is a smear of lube on the loaded ammo it is found on final inspection and might be an indicator that I need to clean the seating die
 

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I was just getting into reloading back about 1956, I accidentally loaded some 45 long colt cartridges way too hot ( wrong page in the powder book ) They would about rip my old Colt out of my hand. Returning home I check my load and realized my error, not having a pull die I just put the remaining cartridges in a box and labeled it as "too hot".

They remained in that box through three moves and in 1995 I found them again. The box had become a mouse nest and had been so for many years. The cartridges were covered with dried mouse urine and goo. I had just purchased a S & W 25-5 and was searching for brass when I found the old stuff. The cases were way oversize to fit in the chambers, Soaked them in dish soap and water, then steel wool to clean them up.

I knew the Mod 25 could take the heavier charges if they were still heavy so was not afraid of hurting the revolver. After 30 years of the worst possible storage conditions, all of them fired!

Some barely pushed the bullet out of the barrel, others made it to the target but not nearly the 'super loads' they had been, some bounced on the way to the target. Only one hang fire for about 1/2 second.

I did not try to use the brass again.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
As promised... range report:

Subject rounds were .32 H&R magnum, Georgia Arms 100gr. 1100 fps JHP encased in a Tuff Products QuickStrip inserted in the weak side pocket of a pair of Eotac 205's.

The rounds were placed thusly (and unknowingly) in a GE Profile Washer along with numerous other items of clothing (but no other ammo) for a period of 50 minutes on the "normal" cycle. The "normal" cycle on this particular unit is comprised of one "warm" wash for a period of about 20 minutes (avg. water temp 80F), a rinse cycle of the same length (avg. water temp 45F) and a spin cycle of about 10 minutes duration. Due to the nature of the testing, the test bed was not configured to measure the centrifugal or impact force exerted on the subject rounds.

Upon removal from the washer, and after a double facepalm moment, the rounds were examined and found to be dry, undamaged and quite shiny. There was no moisture present on the bases of the cartridges leading me to surmise that the QuickStrips had kept them dry as well as having kept them totally secured.

Just now the test rounds were loaded into my my primary carry, a S&W 432PD. They were then fired at a range of 10 yds. at the 10" gong on my backyard range. All rounds ignited and the slugs impacted the gong normally.

Conclusions:

None really, I'll just try to avoid this particular impromptu testing again... :lol:
 

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Excellent report, should stand up to "peer review." :thumbsup:
 
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