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clubbing, knifing you, hmm? Much less raping you, of course. How far away is one who has mugged you from the rear? How far away is the gunman who is demanding that you "hand it over", hmm?Most justifiable civilian self defense shootings occur at arm's length ranges(or less) and about 90% occur at 10 ft or less. So all this concern about how "well" you do at 25 yds, much less 50 yds, is greatly misplaced.

Any shot that the attacker fires can maim you, and it can happen as he keels-over, you know. A shot that "only" shatters your ankle bone can mean that your life is ruined. So I suggest that speed be the big thing in your practice, as vs small groups at 20m or further.


Nearly 90% of attackers will stop at just the sight of your (ready) gun, IF you get it visible to them in time for them to notice it and stop. They will not be stopped by a gun that they can't even SEE yet, so speed of draw is a prime essential, even if you can't yet hit a man, reliably, at such speed, beyond arm's length. If you hit somebody with a bullet, you are extremely likely to have to write a check for $30,000, to pay for lost work, bail bondsman's fees, lawyers, perhaps medical expenses, perhaps loss of business, even having to move (due to your family being harassed) and so on. so if you can "only' get the gun visible, or fire a "miss", and it suffices to stop the guy without bloodshed, you are way ahead.
 

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words of wisdom indeed. preventing a shootout is job #1.

that being said, any responsible gun toter should be ready for any contingencies. you should be able to safely present your weapon from say, a seated position, in a car with seatbelt on, in a restaurant with a table in front of you, when your strongside hand is disabled, etc., etc.

one should practice and drill themselves as much as possible.
 

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:roll: Wish I could agree with you; but, in my opinion, ‘Preventing a shootout is NOT job #1. Preventing the confrontation from occurring, at all, IS. Personally I would never draw to, ‘show a gun’; nor would I, ever, shoot to impress. In my own everyday experience it’s far better NOT to reveal to others that you are armed. Don’t forget that we, now, live in a, ‘cell phone society’; and everyone has the anonymous ability to bring the cops out on the most dishonest or ridiculous of assertions: i.e., ‘There’s a man with a gun, here.’ ‘He threatened me and took my parking space!’ To a responding officer any, ‘man with a gun’ is automatically at a distinct disadvantage.

Unfortunately for me I was, once, the victim of an attempted, ‘car jacking’; and, because I didn’t have the time to be ABSOLUTELY POSITIVE of what was about to happen, I drew from inside my jacket in order to hide the weapon. That thief never knew, ‘What’ I had in my hand; but, criminals aren’t stupid; fact is, most criminals are, probably, better psyched and more alert than you are! This guy quickly recognized that there was something behind my right leg that was about to become, ‘bad news’ for him; and, at about 12 feet, he backed off and went into his, ‘stupid and confused’ routine.

In my experience speed is important in CQB encounters; but, FEEL is more important! Once you make the mental decision to draw, you have three immediate problems: The first is to clear the holster, smoothly, and acquire the, ‘initial trigger point’. The second is to keep your, ‘support hand’ the Hell out of the way! I’m 60 years old, now; and I’ve been shooting since I was a small boy of nine. I’ll say this: If you shoot a lot and are familiar with your weapon, ‘Why’ do you need to, ‘aim’ inside 7 1/2 yards? Personally, at CQB distance, I use the FEEL of my weapon to aim the shot.

AT EXTREMELY CLOSE QUARTERS PROPER GRIP IS EVERYTHING!

As difficult as it may be to believe, I don’t like long posts; as a matter of fact I’ve often been accused of being too brief and tacit. In a, ‘nutshell’, then, you should be able to, ‘feel’ your gun the same way you would hold a pack of cards: Grab it like a loose deck between the web of your thumb and the middle of your fingers rather than squeezing it like a juicy round lemon. At close range, when the front and back straps, ‘feel’ right – push the gun straight forward into the target and tap the trigger. Some people, today, are saying not to look for your bullet strikes; but I always watch my targets for hits; maybe certain others can’t do this; but 99% of the time I DO see my bullets strike. Try not to make muzzle contact, though, because this may force a pistol out-of-battery. Some people touch the entire palm of the support hand to the sternum while others touch with only the thumb. Both methods have their advantages and, primarily, involve sweeping your own centerline of imminent danger.

If you are used to moving about in a mental frame-of-mind similar to Colonel John Boyd’s OODA loop (The buzz phrase, right now.) or Colonel Cooper’s Awareness Color-Code, (Equally useful, but, not presently in vogue.) then, no threat should be able to catch you, completely, unaware. Here are my own rules for CQB; they’ve always worked for me:

1. Always trust your instincts.

2. Always maximize your use of cover.

3. If contact is inevitable then, ideally, force the problem to come at you.

4. Step aside. (In hand-to-hand step to your right because, this way, most adversaries will have to reach across their own bodies in order to, ‘have at you’. In a gun fight step to your left. (Never mind, ‘Why’. Oh, all right; because it’ll be harder for the other guy to, ‘point’ his gun if he doesn’t have his OWN body centerline to, ‘index’ with. Try it, sometime; you’ll see.)

I have a good friend who, once, told me; 'I’ve hunted, both, men and deer.' 'The mistakes, always, seemed to occur whenever I tried to move too fast.' I have another acquaintance who doesn't use his pistol in confined spaces with the usual extended two-hand hold. (Point, lower, look, point, lower, look, … etc.) Instead he holds his gun in the, ‘retention position’ and waits until he has a target before he extends his arm(s). (Apparently he had his pistol knocked out of his hands, once; and, on another occasion, he had his gun grabbed and twisted loose in the ensuing struggle.) Personally, I believe my friends are correct.

Sure, showing a gun will, sometimes, prevent an attack from happening; but, it may, also, create a whole new set of problems for you to have to deal with. It’s your call; so, don’t forget rule number one, above; and, if you do decide to shoot, then, SHOOT TO KILL as quickly and efficiently as possible! :wink:
 
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