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Honest, this was actually published....

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Guns Magazine (June 1979)
Cooper's Corner: "Shooting's Latest Fad?"

It may be a coincidence but just last week I noticed a headline in Gun Week. To wit: "MAINE SHOOTING FIRST AT OYSTER RANGE." At the same time there came across my desk the announcement of a new supply of 8mm Nambu pistol ammunition. These two developments seemed to have been made for each other, because I can't think of a better oyster cartridge than the 8mm Nambu. Certainly it isn't good for anything else. If the Maine shootings are going to take up oyster shooting I think we have a new and untapped source of faddism at hand.

Now as we all know Japanese pistols that take the 8mm cartridge have been out of print for more than a generation, and so that we have the ammunition we must look about for a weapon to shoot it in. To compound coincidence I was just notified by Frank Pachmayr that he is now producing his successful rubber stocks for the Thompson Contender pistol. Now then, if we bring out a Thompson Contender in 8mm Nambu, and fit it with Pachmayr rubber stocks, we have perhaps the ideal oyster weapon. Obviously such a piece should be Armaloyed to take care of the high salt content encountered in most oyster beds. Come to think of it, if Frank Pachmayr could be prevailed upon we might get him to produce a rubber Thompson Contender to take the 8mm Nambu which would be completely rust-proof throughout. Perhaps a rubber Contender with stainless steel stocks would be the ultimate answer.

Now as to ammunition, if we could get a Glaser safety slug for the 8mm Nambu to fire in the rubber Contender, I think that we would have the dream weapon for people who intend to compete in the unlimited oyster class.

If all the foregoing sounds squirrelly to you, don't let it trouble you. People who pursue their sporting fancies to the absolute end can come up with things that you have never dreamed of. Obviously in the case of the new oyster pistol we have only just scratched the surface, not having yet mag-na-ported it or equipped it with some sort of laser sight. As the oyster shooting craze catches on you may look for new and remarkable developments in this area.
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Guns Magazine (October 1979)
Letters: "B.S.'ers Rise to the Bait"

We of the Oregon Bivalve Shooting Assoc. (OBSA) must object to the derogatory manner with which you referred to our oyster shooting brethren in Maine. While we shoot the much more interesting clam out her, the entire sport of Bivalve Shooting (or B.S.ing as we prefer to call it) is much misunderstood and maligned.

The calm, considered to be a spineless creature by some, is in truth one of the most underrated game animals in North America. Many a competitor in our matches (or mucks as we refer to them) has broken into a characteristic slight chill sweat when confronted by one of these cold blooded beasts. Some cases of shell shock have even been reported! To come out on top, one has to have enough grit to really dig in.

The 8mm Nambu which you suggest, while used by some, is really marginal for this us. Admiral Thacher's RCP (Relative Chowder Power) scale rates the Nambu at an impotent 6.7, where it takes at least a 7.3 to pass.

There is a much better cartridge for B.S.ing - the incomparable Rutr/Pawzi 7.3mm. This little known round was developed between wars for use by the Polish cavalry. Only the misfortune of the date planned for its introduction (Oct. 1939) kept this excellent round from carving a more enduring niche in history.

Its most unique feature is the fact that it fires its case and ejects the bullet. This unusual design feature no doubt accounts for its remarkable RCP of 34.765. Once a few minor extraction problems were solved; it rapidly rose to a pre-eminent position; no serious competitor in the I.B.S.C. (International Bivalve Shooting Confederation) uses anything else.

I feel obligated to comment on your totally absurd suggestion about making an all rubber gun with stainless steel stocks. This is one of the most common mistakes that the armchair B.S.er makes. As anyone who has had practical experience could tell you: Stainless steel is not a suitable material for gun stocks!

As you can see, far from being a "fad," B.S.ing is here to stay. Some even feel that the history of B.S.ing parallels the history of firearms writing itself! We would like to invite you to attend one of our matches. If you'd like, we'll send you a copy of our newsletter, The Muckraker, with a complete schedule.

Until then as we say, "Here's mud in your eye!"

Best Wishes,
Ed Rosch
Pres. O.B.S.A.
I am at a loss to understand your assumption of derogation in commenting upon my remarks about the Maine Oyster Shooting Association. In this day in which specialties have run rife, it seems only fair to give every bivalve his due. Along the South Coast, for example, there seems to be much interest in a new periwinkle club which encourages its members to graduate into serious abalone shooting, and naturally in the South Pacific there are the Dangerous Mollusk Hunters who concentrate with heavy calibers upon tridacna or giant clam.

If you dislike the idea of stainless steel for mollusk pistols, I suggest that you note that the South Africans are now turning to gold for the stocks of their weapons since they have so much of it. Gold, in addition to having a nice feel to the hand, is totally proof against the corrosion of salt water, as you well know.

I trust that the Oregon Bivalve Shooting Association will establish contact with fellow devotes of its activities throughout the world and graduate into the world-wide game of International B.S.ing.

With all good wishes for the future of the sport.

Cordially,
Jeff Cooper
 

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Cooper's Inspiration?

Reminds me of a line from a classic episode of one of the best TV sitcoms, "Barney Miller." In "Hash" (1976), much of the 12th Precinct Detective Squad unknowingly ingests brownies laced with hasish. A stoned Det. Nick Yemana (played by the late Jack Soo) says to the straight Capt. Miller, "Hey, Barn - let's go to the beach and shoot some clams."

As I recall, Yemana's weapon was a 2" Colt Detective Special.
 

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Fact is Stranger than Fiction: Oyster Wars of the Chesapeake

The Bay Journal: Vol 13 - Number 8 (November 2003)

Past is Prologue: "No matter what shells are fired in oyster wars, the resource always loses"

Back in the late 1970s, when I was a field biologist for the Academy of Natural Sciences, I was asked to help the laboratory acquire a boat for some of its aquatic programs....

The first of her unpleasant surprises, though, appeared in a wooden gear box on her afterdeck. It contained an assortment of junk: shackles, bits of chain, old dock lines and at the bottom - two badly rusted artillery projectiles that were clearly "live" warheads.

One of the rounds had what appeared to be a brass inset near the base, that when rubbed smooth, revealed the date 1898.
 

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Re: Cooper's Inspiration?

LIProgun said:
Reminds me of a line from a classic episode of one of the best TV sitcoms, "Barney Miller."
That show was a classic. 99.9% was filmed on a single set, year after year. They don't make them "smart" like that anymore.

Ed
 

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As the head of the Arizona Clam Claimers Association, I must remonstrate with you about the stopping power needed. Only a RCSP (Relative Clam Stopping Power) of 86 is fit to take on these AZ clams. Due to their tendancy to hide under 6' of sand in our former seas, AP rounds, with rocket assist, are needed.

Join us for our next Clam Claiming, Feb. 31, 2004 at the Goldwater Gunnery Range, Gate 2. Shovels are required at all ACCA events.
 
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