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I decided I need to loose the gut I'm starting to grow and I rode a sport bike in Mexico. I like it so I went to Wally World and got this one for $100.
I replaced the stock seat with a gel filled one. I know it's not a Trek or any other expensive one but all I'll do is ride around my nieghborhood.

 

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Screaming ---


Use it in good health --- just be careful to do it in moderation until you are in shape. I wish I could get back on my bike, but in 98 I did an ENDO towards the end of a 75 mile ride and screwed up my patella --- have not been able since that date to ride more than a mile pain free :cry:
Since that wipeout, my weight has risen by 60 lbs :shock: And even a prolonged walk causes pain!

Mike
 

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Screaming-

I've gotta tell you, I also started riding again in '89 with a $100 bike, and it didn't look nearly as good as that one. Best of luck with it. I really miss it sometimes, but old knees and a certain persistant numbness pretty much killed it for me in '99.
I trust you know that seat height is real important for keeping happy, pain-free knees. Too low or too high can really screw you. I've seen many people riding with with their seats set way too low. If you don't know how to adjust it correctly for you, ask someone to show you- it really is important.

Have fun on that beast!
 

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After a back injury, I didn't ride for 8 years. My then 10 year old son kept begging me to take him riding around the neighborhood, so I went out and bought a bike. I spent a little more for my new "first bike" ($300) because I bought it from a local bike shop.
It felt great to be back on the bike...in fact, I ended up trading the $300 bike 45 days later on a $1000 bike.

That was 1997. Six years later and I now have a Lemond OCLV road bike and a Specialized FSR XC Pro MTB. I ride 2,000 - 3,000 miles a year. :D

It's a fun activity and you can meet a lot of people with diverse backgrounds. And, it's great for your health, as long as you don't crash! :x

No matter what some folks may tell you...buy a good helmet and WEAR it each and every time you ride. My helmets (I've cracked a couple over the years) have saved my skull on numerous ocasions.
 

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first bicycle

Just bought your first bicycle, eh? Well, keep it off of city streets and backroads. Ride it around your neighborhood, in designated bike lanes, or on designated bicycle paths. There is nothing more dangerous than riding a bicycle on country backroads where the speed limit is 45 and most people do 60. Bicycles cause a *LOT* of traffic accidents around here.... but more than that, they cause a lot of road rage.

Basically, if it doesn't have an engine, keep it off the streets and everyone ends up happier.

Charles.
 

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ChopperCharles said:
There is nothing more dangerous than riding a bicycle on country backroads where the speed limit is 45 and most people do 60. Bicycles cause a *LOT* of traffic accidents around here.... but more than that, they cause a lot of road rage.

Basically, if it doesn't have an engine, keep it off the streets and everyone ends up happier.
Unfortunatly, alot of areas do not have designated bike lanes or bike paths so if a person is to ride it has to be on the street. I am not sure of North Carolina Law, but here in West Virginia, it is ILLEGAL for a person to ride a bike on a sidewalk. Alot of the problems between Car/Truck Drivers and Bicycle Riders is ignorance on one part or the other. When I was riding alot, I would stay as far towards the berm as possible if I was below the speed limit, however if I was at or above the speed limit I would ride towards the center of the lane. Alot of Bicycle riders think that traffic signals and signs don't pertain to them, but in the eyes of the law or a police officer they do.

I never really had any problems with road rage against me, but when I was riding, I always carried a Glock 27 in a Galco Miami Classic shoulder rig and a fanny pack to hold the bottom of the Galco Rig (before anyone gives me crap on the Galco, this was before Mitch started making a shoulder rig). Only once did it come in to play when I had 5 college punks decide they were going to be tough guys --- then one of em noticed the Glock and they realized their 5 on 1 advantage was acutally a 11 on 5 slant in my favor. They thought better and got back into their car hastily.

Mike
 

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DM-SC said:
No matter what some folks may tell you...buy a good helmet and WEAR it each and every time you ride. My helmets (I've cracked a couple over the years) have saved my skull on numerous ocasions.
I have a son who is an endurance athlete. On April 5, 1988 he was cycling in training for a short triathlon, when he was hit from behind by a 4-dr Chrysler Sedan doing ~ 65mph. He was terribly injured overall, including Traumatic Brain Injury. Last Fall he completed his first Iron Man distance triathlon at UNC.

No helmet = No son. He had his. We still have that son.

You wear your helmet. Especially when you are out riding with your kids. The best leadership is by example. Or, do you want your kids to be raised by your Court Appointed Guardian?
 

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illegal

Better to ride illegally on the sidewalk than get splattered on the street. Like bicyclists care about laws anyhow. They ignore all traffic laws around here, and try and act as both car and pedestrian at the same time. The sail right through stopsigns and stoplights, go between cars, and generally make a big nuisance of themselves.

Furthermore, the most dangerous part about bicycling is the fact that cars swing wide into the oncoming lane to get around bicyclists, WITHOUT REGARD to the oncoming traffic. This is especially true if the oncoming traffic is a motorcycle. I've been run off the road twice because a braindead soccer mom was trying to get around a slow moving bicyclist. She had enough room, but the two cars behind her that followed without checking had me off the road into a ditch.

So basically, if there's no bike lane or sidewalk, stay off the street. Find somewhere else to pedal. Oh... and spandex looks gay, and those colorful foam beanie bicycle helmets aren't worth a damn in a crash.

Charles.
 

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I've had my old Fuji S-10-S "Special Road Racer" since the fall of '76 and have ridden it tens of thousands of miles. Sure, most of the components have been upgraded or replaced over the years. Things wear out. Still has the original frame, fork brakes and handlebars, and that's about it. How many miles have I ridden it on the sidewalks? I'm sure it is less than 10 miles total or less than .001%. Sidewalks just don't exist out here in the country. There is a heck of a lot less traffic out here, too.

My 10.7 mile commute now is along a 55mph state highway, of course with no sidewalks. I ride on the white paint stripe at the side of the road, never varying more than 3-4" off that line. There are no other roads. I use a 60-80 flash per minute high intensity strobe light (USCG appoved) mounted on the rear of my rack for visibility, in addition to the three 2" diameter red reflectors, and the two amber reflectors on the pedals, and reflective tape on my helmet, clothing and rack stays.

I do stop at stop lights and stop signs, and obey other traffic laws.

You want scary? Try a ride in my mailtruck. People pass me in that also without regard for oncoming traffic. That certaily isn't small, so what is the problem? I'd have to say impatient drivers. They absolutely can't wait five seconds to wait for a gap in oncoming traffic and to pass with assured clear distance...
 

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Before my knees started to go, I rode 175 miles a week on my road bike (Kliein Performance), and rode mountain bikes (Peugeot Kings Canyon & a Nishiki Alien, mostly) in the hills and muck of the middle Hudson River Valley for many years. None of the serious riders I knew then tried to challenge cars for room on the road. We rode inside the white line whenever possible, avoided high speed and traffic areas, and always followed the same rules as cars (except the speed limit on a good downhill). This was considered an essential code of conduct for shareing the road with big, fast things that are waiting to cream you. During that time, I was hit once by a car, deliberately run off the road several times, and have had garbage thrown at me on several occasions. I still think that anyone on a 22 pound bicycle who deliberately antagonises a 2 ton vehicle is meeting grounds for committment based on suicidality.

Now I ride overpowered motorcycles at license-losing speeds, and feel much, much safer. When I meet the crazies on the road, instead of being completely at their mercy, all I have to do is romp on the throttle, and wave goodbye.

I personally have a great deal of respect for serious bicyclists.
 

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Yeah, I rode up to about 2 years ago. I got pretty serious about it and
rode and trained and raced. I was riding about 7K to 10K a year for 6 years. I did a few races and even tried to get into race across america by doing the furnice creek 508. I didnt make it into raam but did finish the race. I have a bianchi Ti Mega tube and 3 other frames all bianchi. I would still be riding if it wasn't for the crazy drivers and mini vans with baseball bats. Remember to always wear your helmet and make sure it fits right. As for saddles you may want to try riding shorts or bibs as they have padding in all the right places. Saddle height and tip
is very important . If you start to ride alot or just want to be more comfortable when you do you may want to have your riding posistion
set up for you. A good bicycle shop can help you with that. They can get your saddle height, and tip set your reach and make sure you dont
mash on the peddles spin for the first few months you have to think circles it sounds strange but most people peddle sqaure. Above all have fun and keep an eye out all around you at all times. Have fun.
Johan :D
 

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Rut- I wish.
No, it's an '03 Bonneville with too much time and money into it. I've always wanted a Norton 750/850 Commando, but sitting on the side of the road with a sick bike isn't as much fun as it used to be. The new Bonnies are turning out to be pretty dependable, even by modern standards. It's also nice not to see large puddles of oil in your parking spot.
 

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Ah, the way it's tricked out I never gave a thought that it might be a new offering. Well, having had over thirty Brit bikes over the years I'm well familiar with their shortcomings, but they sure were fun at the time! :)
 
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