Gun Hub Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at one on auction here in Canada and was wondering how IBM rated in the manufacture of M1 Carbines? They make some of the nicer ones, poorer ones, or just in between :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I've got an IBM Blue-Sky Import that's sporting the original barrel, as well as other major parts w/ an SA type 3 barrel band and a stamped adjustable site IRCO... The stock is what my Dad calls "monkey-wood" from his Southeast Asian adventures.

It shoots quite well and was well worth the $380 I dropped on it at a gunshow last year. I've got a few different carbines but this one is my favorite and sees the most time in the woods/at the range-

Hope this helps-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
When mighty quinn bought his IBM carbine for $380.00 he got a good buy, it would bring closer to $475-$500 here in AZ. A non import marked post WW2 rebuilt IBM carbine with a IBM barrel may Fetch $600 or more depending on it's condition and parts make-up. These dollar figures are just ball park, and if you get some carbine nut who needs a IBM to fill out his collection bidding against you all bets are off.
 
G

·
IBM had its problems with production, but overall they are fine. Since the military had strict requirements of parts interchangeability and steel hardness/heat treating, one is about as good as another. I lean towards Inland as the "best", since they developed most of the gauges and drawings for the initial production, much to Winchesters chagrin. They were VERY good at assembly line production being part of GM, and it showed. They also had some very good people working for them, and they helped out most of the other manufacturers.
Once they were built and accepted however, they were pretty much the same. Now, the name is the selling point, and IBM, Rock-Ola and Winchesters command premiums, even though there is nothing special about them. Once you go beyond the names, then the more rare receivers/subcontractors and variations become desirable. What's the going rate up there for good USGI Carbines? :D
 
G

·
Outside of some of the AOB (Auto Ordnance-IBM) type 3 bolts being defective with heat treating problems....the ones I had, shot.. quite well. If you see a type 3 AOB marked bolt with a large and small "X" of the top...it was inspected and passed for issue by IBM, after some of their heat treating problems came into the picture with first production runs of these bolts. :D
 
G

·
Hey Marine1, let's pick your brain here (shouldn't take long, eh? :lol: ). I just shipped a Carbine for a buddy, had a round bolt unmarked except for the X. AO bolt, replacement maybe? Waddaya think? :D I read somewhere that Rock-Ola had this hardness problem also, and marked some of their test bolts with just an X.
 
G

·
OK, I'll try to explain this as simple as I can to you, Wayne. :lol: How large was the "X"? Where was it located...Top front....top center...top rear? Auto-Ordnance marked their bolts on the lub....NOT lug...but LUB! :lol: Most all of the type 3 AOB bolts I have seen, were machine stamped deep mark. Seriously...Rock-ola marked their slides, with a small x...this was thought to be a random Rockwell hardness inspection. I don't recall, seeing any of Rock-ola's bolts marked with an x??? On your question that this bolt you had, with an X but unmarked, may be a replacement...I have no data on this...anything is possible where the carbine is concerned. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
wayneCP01 said:
IBM had its problems with production, but overall they are fine. Since the military had strict requirements of parts interchangeability and steel hardness/heat treating, one is about as good as another. I lean towards Inland as the "best", since they developed most of the gauges and drawings for the initial production, much to Winchesters chagrin. They were VERY good at assembly line production being part of GM, and it showed. They also had some very good people working for them, and they helped out most of the other manufacturers.
Once they were built and accepted however, they were pretty much the same. Now, the name is the selling point, and IBM, Rock-Ola and Winchesters command premiums, even though there is nothing special about them. Once you go beyond the names, then the more rare receivers/subcontractors and variations become desirable. What's the going rate up there for good USGI Carbines? :D
$300-$400 canadian......
 
G

·
That sounds good, as last time I looked the Canadian dollar was less than the US dollar. If so, that's a good price. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Not sure whether you get many gunshows up in The Great White North but if I'm in the market, I usually roll through towards the end of the show with cash... That's how I scored my IBM-

Several times, I've also met folks in the lot bringing things into the show to sell. Usually these folks are older gents selling what I consider to be the best of collectors pieces... Those with stories...

When a vet looks you in the eye and relates the history of his rifle and times/places spent on duty, you can tell that you're truly handling a piece of history. I've actually picked up two carbines from Vets who "brought em back in the sack"...

One of them was the father of my Dad's best friend. He carried his Inland as a prison guard in The Philippines after McArthur "returned". He also served in Okinawa as well as part of the Occupying Forces in Japan. He's taken many a deer with it in Pennsylvania following the war including a shot through a small tree while heeding "Ye Olde Call of Nature"...

The stories are the true treasure. Both of the guys I have had the pleasure to meet and do business with were pleased to know that I won't parts or sell thier issued weapons. They're part of my family and will be used to teach my kids to shoot one day.

I also have a Korean War bring back Quality HW that has the most gorgeous stock I've ever seen... Pics to follow-

MQ
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top