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The youth and enthusiasm wing of gun writers has published an interesting and frightening article on his blog.

The Lead Trojan Horse. | Mad Ogre

Young George Hill makes a point. Does anyone know where I can get one of those lead detection wipes?

Geoff
Who will exercise his google-do later, there is house and yard maintenance to be committed. :dunno:
 

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I think it must be a function of our school systems that younger people no longer have a sense of perspective about toxins. Instead of seeing toxicity as a spectrum from "nearly harmless" to "plutonium", they see it as black and white...something is either "poison" or it isn't. This tends to explain the ridiculous hysteria over things such as traces of inert pesticide residue on an apple, asbestos that's tightly bound in blocks of insulation, the current fadish infatuation with gluten, or (yep, I'm gonna say it) lead exposure.

Lead is a relatively mild toxin that requires ingestion in fairly large quantities before harm is done. If I was smelting lead on a regular basis I'd certainly be careful to avoid fumes. If I worked at an indoor range, I'd probably want a filtration system. I understand that leaded gasoline was putting low concentrations of lead in the atmosphere that, inhaled over a lifetime, could conceivably have caused a few of us to have health problems.

But, I don't eat bullets, I don't lick my range bag, and I don't drink my grog from a pewter flagon. I've studied some on this issue, and I'm convinced that incidental proximity to lead is about as close to harmless as anything on this earth.
 

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I think you've exceeded your common sense expression limit for the quarter.

If the chattering classes/safety ninnies had any sense of proportion, we'd never hear from them. That would be devastating for their sense of self worth.
 

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Some time ago when I had a real job I was an analytical chemist with a specialty in toxic metals.

I read all the literature about lead and while the risks can be real toxicity comes from continuous exposure to high levels. It is cumulative but the average shooter who washes his hands after shooting has little to worry about.

Of course there are always "chicken littles" who predict the end is near if we don't buy their product.

Those who work in indoor ranges or clean guns all day do need to be monitored but average shooters don't.

One of my favorite factoids is that you drink enough water it too will kill you.
 

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In my early shooting days, it was all Uncle Sam's ammo, at his ranges and on his time. Since my AFSC was Security Police, a lot of it was with the S&W M-15, and as I have said before, all we ever shot at the range back then was 148 grain full wadcutter target ammo.

The couple of years I shot competitively in the USAF, we would spend entire DAYS on the range practicing over a period of weeks, if not months.

Of course we cleaned our own weapons...at the range. And never were we instructed (or inclined ) to wash our hands immediately afterwards. Oh, once we returned our guns to the armory and hit the latrines, sure.

When I reloaded, it was almost exclusively lead bullets. I'd wash up afterwards but more just for the fact gunk that would accumulate, some of which was lead residue I'm sure.

And the vast majority of my shooting has always been done in the outdoors.

Those of you who know me, please refrain from pointing out that those facts could explain a lot about my appearance, behavior and mental state. ;)
 
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