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I would like to build some steel targets for shooting at ranges between 100 and 600 yards with calibers up to .300 win

I am looking for something simple (actually I mean cheap) that doesn't require manual resetting.

What have you guys built?
What size is the target area?
What steel did you use?
 

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Hang it from a chain which will need periodic replacement
3 MOA sounds about right
Make it out of heat treated steel, 500 Brinell or harder. You can find this in fabrication shops.
 

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Let's just go to the scrap-yard and buy some steel bulk-head caps!

14 inches, 34 lbs, 3/4 inch thick solid machined steel.

They take a lickin' and keep getting re-painted! - for next time 8)

[IMG=left]http://webs.lanset.com/ecvslick/enfield9.jpg[/IMG]

The BEST tip I can offer is to paint them WHITE first before shooting on a florescent color - they will be SO much brighter!
 

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100 yards will be far enough to not worry about ricochet, but any closer and you will want to consider putting a hanger on the back so it will hang at an angle to deflect bullet downward.

I have a shorter range (50 yds) on some property and use out-of-date propane tanks (empty of course). I have a steel cable between two trees and hang them with steel wire or light cable (will use chain when I run out of current inventory). You can find these free or cheap from gas suppliers and they make nice dynamic targets particularly for pistols or lighter rounds.
 

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Anyone said:
Let's just go to the scrap-yard and buy some steel bulk-head caps!

14 inches, 34 lbs, 3/4 inch thick solid machined steel.

They take a lickin' and keep getting re-painted! - for next time 8)

[IMG=left]http://webs.lanset.com/ecvslick/enfield9.jpg[/IMG]

The BEST tip I can offer is to paint them WHITE first before shooting on a florescent color - they will be SO much brighter!
Good idea! These items are actually called "blind flanges" and are used to seal piping systems. They come in sizes for 1/2"pipe, which will have an O.D. of 3 1/2", and a thickness of 7/16"... up to sizes that require forklift or cranes to pick them up.

Thickness varies with 150psi being the lowest rating....used in the above example.
 

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How are these targets at handling FMJs? I know you can't use them on most commercial steel targets, but I wasn't sure about the home-brewed kinds.

And how common are these blind flanges? Are they something that my local scrap yard would normally have laying around?
 

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Metal Targets

Most metal works, old gas cylinders like oxygen and other pressure
cyllinders that won't hydro past pressure test.
Grader blades, loader bucket edges, snow plow blades and steel
that is 3/4 plus thick will ring. What turns out to be useful is a foot square piece of metal placed
on a base and shoot it when it rings you know your on target,
switch over to a paper target for group data.
AR 500 bernell plate is around 1200 a 1/2 in sheet. a sheet is
4X8 ft can make lot of targets.
 

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Some friends and I have made a number of steel targets over the last year or so. We started by cutting some out of generic 1/2" (ASTM A36?) plate, and shot them at 100-300 yds with a variety of rifles - AR 15, M14, Garand, Mosin-Nagat, Mauser, Lee-Enfield, etc.. And found that common ball ammo made big craters in the plates.

Then I asked here about target quality steel awhile back, and found mention of some type of steel that has been used sucessfully by others in the past (not the 500 brinnell stuff, but better than generic steel), but when my buddy called his supplier (and some others - he works at a fabrication shop, so he has regular suppliers for steel), they didnt have any.

Then my buddy decided to try having the plates heat treated - his company was having some parts hardened (unsure of the exact procedure - whether they were carburized or simply heated and quenched) to make them more wear resistant, and he simply included a couple of 6" diameter 1/2" thick plates since it didnt cost extra. We shot at these at 200 and 300 yds and they look much better than the non- hardened plates did. There are still craters, but they are very small - the targets ought to last much longer before they are swiss cheese and dangerous to handle due to a large number of sharp edges.

Our current problem is the lack of a good place to shoot such targets.
 
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