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There is a company called Anza Knives run by Master Craftsman and knifemaker Charlie Davis that specializes in making reasonably priced field knives from old files. The files are anealed, their metalurgy changes from the super hard but brittle staate that you want in a file to the relatively softer and more flexible steel you want in a knife.

The result of all this effort is a beautiful knife. The grind leaves part of the files markings on it but IMHO, that just enhances the appearance.

These are thick, strong, super sharp knives, knives made to be used in the field. They are perfect for anything from skinning to chopping firewood. Blades range from small (2.5") to over 5". The normal handle is multicolored polymer impregnated wood but you can order anything from mycarta to antler. Each knife is unique and you'll never find twoo the same.

I've had two Anzas for several years now and they have lived up to every expectation. Since they are built from an O-1 steel, you need to keep a layer of oil on them just as you would a good file, but boy do they cut. And they are a joy to sharpen. In the field a couple draws over a sandstone or most any rock will give you an edge you can really shave with.

They come with a heavy field grade sheath. These are work knives in every way and not your WallMart wannabes by any stretch of the imagination.





If you're in the market for a real workhorse of a knife at bargain prices, stop by Anza knives and maybe even drop Charlie Davis an e-mail.
 

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jar,

Thanks for the great pics and info on the knifemaker!! 8)

There are a lot of knifemakers out there and it is interesting to see some of their work.

I have not been on as much as usual because we had a baby on July 21. In fact I am typing this one handed while feeding her 6AM bottle!! :D

Her name is Ariel Rebecca and we have been blessed because our 16mo old son (Jared) just loves his sister and is not jealous at all (yet??)

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Congratulations.
 
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Jar,

I've got a set of knives made by Master Bladesmith Daniel Winkler. These are also made of old files.

While not "bargain priced" I looked at it a different way. Most of Daniel's knives are one of a kind. I contacted him and we got into a discussion of exactly what I wanted.... a camp knive and a skinner. He sent me some drawing. I took those, along with his catalog, and drew up set that I envisioned. I also drew up the sheath to carry them... a double sheath with the skinner resting on top of the camp knife. After I sent them to him we talked again.

The knives were not a problem. While Karen had never done a double sheath before she said she could do it. My question to him was was it historically correct. His reply was that he could find no reference to one but was of the opinion that "Mountain Men" were of an expiedenat nature and the design would have served the purpose of less space used on the belt.

I ordered the set and have been using them as my "hunting" set (Daniel really doen't like people not using his knives (i.e. collectors). The knives are great and work perfectly... and like you said are a joy to sharpen. A few licks and I can shave with them.

I know I could probably sell the knives for much more then I paid for them, what with Daniels work becoming much more in demand, but they will be passed down to one of my children for their use on hunts.
 

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Schmit

How about a picture of them? He does some really good work and I particularly enjoy his Primatives.

One of the funny things is that there is this belief that in the Olden Days, files and saws were often recycled into knives.

Actually, it very seldom happened. The steel used in files and saws was so expensive, so hard and so brittle that it was much easier to use some thing else. It's actually only been with the advent of modern metalurgy and the throw away society that it's become practical to recycle files into knives.

But boy do they work well in the field.
 
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