Gun Hub Forums banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I'm in the early stages of looking for a new rifle, preferably in the .270 to .30-06 range, I've got a 7mm rem mag so I don't need a heavy hitter, I'm not looking to spend a fortune because the gun will not spend any time in a safe. I work on a cattle farm and I'm wanting something to ride around with all day in the backseat for coyotes or the likes. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,678 Posts
In all my years, I've never been able to tell the difference in anything squarely hit between a .270 & 7mm mag; the performance and results are nearly identical on animals actually hit as opposed to numbers in a book. I can't think of anything I would hunt with a 7 mag that I wouldn't hunt with a .270. Nor would I take a shot with a heavy 7mm mag that I wouldn't take with a premium .270 bullet like a 130 grain Barnes TSX. So with that in mind, I'd either stick with the 7 mag, or I'd dump the 7 mag and pick up either an '06 or .270, whichever floats your boat (again, not a damn bit of real world difference between the two cartridges).

Then I'd take the money saved and go buy something fun, or more ammo.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,882 Posts
jmote54,

WELCOME ABOARD.

Based on my experience, a Model 760 Remington PUMP in .30.06 or .270 Winchester works well, has plenty of power & a FAST 2nd shot if it's needed. CHEAP, too as a "good used rifle".
(My pet pump-gun is in .300 Savage, with an OLD Aimpoint red-dot sight.)

The Model 760 seems to get "cruddy", muddy (as PU-guns always do on the farm!!!) & "just keeps on keeping on".

yours, sw
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,882 Posts
jmote54,

Kevin is, as usual, correct. = I might keep the 7mm Mag and buy a .243 or maybe a .223.

yours, sw
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
" heavy hitter?' ha- not even close- you've been misled, my friend- your 7mm uses the EXACT SAME DIAMETER AS THE 280/284 -the difference is speed and that's all- same deal exists between 308 win/06/and any 300 magnum- and the difference in the real world amounts to about 75 yards between the 3 30 calibers in mbr- maximum point blank range- the 308 is 265, the 06 is 276, and the 300 is 325 or thereabouts, all using the same 180 grain bullet- where the difference shows is in AMOUNT of powder consumed to achieve that extra yardage- now, if you want talk heavy hitters, most folks consider the 338 win mag a MEDIUM- you need to get into 375 or better to get into the "heavy" category- buy a non magnum 30 caliber in a fast action( pump, lever, or semi) and sharpen your stalking skills
not to mention the fact that you lose 2 rounds capacity b/c of the belt when you move to magnum
cattle ranch eh?- I've been known to spend a few hours on horseback- my scabbard rifle is a savage 99 in 308 Winchester loaded with 180 grain grand slams- we run the east slopes of the rockies, between sundre and the border, and east as far as Calgary- that's all high country and we got big cats and griz to contend with
and it's cattle RANCH, not farm- j/k
now for coyotes all you need is a 243 - your 30 calibers and even your 270 will make them explode- they're too light boned - the bullets pass right through- all you'll get is one shot and the rest will scatter
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,173 Posts
At one time, Dr. Snake would have prescribed a Remington 788 in .308 for you, but the last one of those I saw had an asking price higher than several nice 700s at the same gun show. :shock:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,882 Posts
Snake45,

EXACTLY SO.

on another topic: Did you notice that the NY TIMES has (ten years later) admitted that they KNOWINGLY LIED about "There were no WMD in Iraq"?

yours, sw
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,173 Posts
Actually there are several modern incarnations of the old Rem 788 available today--I think Remington, Ruger, Mossberg, and Savage all have "value-priced" basic knockaround-grade bolt actions. In fact, I think just a few months ago I read a gun rag article that did a roundup and shootoff of them. I think it was in either Guns & Ammo or American Rifleman.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,678 Posts
Actually there are several modern incarnations of the old Rem 788 available today--I think Remington, Ruger, Mossberg, and Savage all have "value-priced" basic knockaround-grade bolt actions. In fact, I think just a few months ago I read a gun rag article that did a roundup and shootoff of them. I think it was in either Guns & Ammo or American Rifleman.
I would take ANY North American game with a .308, that includes Grizzly. A 160 grain Barns TSX would make very short work of the largest Griz provided you did your job.

The .308 is SUCH a great cartridge and incredibly versatile. It's biggest draw is how common it is, you'll find good ammo pretty much anywhere on the globe.

HOWEVER - If I were going out to buy a brand new rifle, it would be a .260 Remington; which is just a modern incarnation of the 6.5x55 Swede. The 260 when paired with a 160 grain premium bullet will take down anything hit squarely, and will do it with typically less recoil, and better exterior ballistics than the .308. But the money bullet is the 140 grain, which would be my choice for deer on up to heavy Caribou. I'd reserve the 160's for Moose and Griz, but I wouldn't turn down a shot at a good Moose or Griz if I had a premium 140 grain 6.5 bullet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
I would take ANY North American game with a .308, that includes Grizzly. A 160 grain Barns TSX would make very short work of the largest Griz provided you did your job.

The .308 is SUCH a great cartridge and incredibly versatile. It's biggest draw is how common it is, you'll find good ammo pretty much anywhere on the globe.

HOWEVER - If I were going out to buy a brand new rifle, it would be a .260 Remington; which is just a modern incarnation of the 6.5x55 Swede. The 260 when paired with a 160 grain premium bullet will take down anything hit squarely, and will do it with typically less recoil, and better exterior ballistics than the .308. But the money bullet is the 140 grain, which would be my choice for deer on up to heavy Caribou. I'd reserve the 160's for Moose and Griz, but I wouldn't turn down a shot at a good Moose or Griz if I had a premium 140 grain 6.5 bullet.
within the parameters of this discussion, you make valid points- the 308 is at it's best with 165 bullets and loaded warm to hot; however, years of elk( wapiti) and grizzly and a LOT of "campfire b/s" would suggest your loads are marginal at best- the "norm" is 250 yards and under, and a 180 grain spitzer or solid-as far as a griz goes, even though they're protected now, our bears grow to 9-10-12 feet and 1000 pounds or better- that's 338 winmag territory with 250 or better spritzers- I have a special load that's reserved for grizzly/brown- speer 275 grain grand slams moving at 2800 fps- I've only 20 of these rounds left, and I save them for when they're really needed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,678 Posts
within the parameters of this discussion, you make valid points- the 308 is at it's best with 165 bullets and loaded warm to hot; however, years of elk( wapiti) and grizzly and a LOT of "campfire b/s" would suggest your loads are marginal at best- the "norm" is 250 yards and under, and a 180 grain spitzer or solid-as far as a griz goes, even though they're protected now, our bears grow to 9-10-12 feet and 1000 pounds or better- that's 338 winmag territory with 250 or better spritzers- I have a special load that's reserved for grizzly/brown- speer 275 grain grand slams moving at 2800 fps- I've only 20 of these rounds left, and I save them for when they're really needed
It certainly wouldn't be ideal, but if it's all I had, I have a great deal of confidence in my marksmanship, and my judgment in the field. I wouldn't pick a .308 as a dedicated large game gun, but I wouldn't skip out on a hunt because the only thing I had was a .308.

I turn down a LOT more shots on game than I take. I don't pull the trigger unless I "own" that animal. So my statements are with that in mind. Far too many people go to more gun in the belief it will make up for poor marksmanship. They pick the bigger gun in case they hit a shoulder, it will plow through the shoulder better than the smaller bullet. But a 100 yard shot with a .308 and a premium bullet can get through shoulder quite effectively. Where a .338 can do the same at nearly 300 yards. The man with the smaller gun just needs to HUNT more than shoot, and get closer to make sure.

I recall where Hemingway gave up his Holland & Holland .470 for his Griffin & Howe .30-06 on Rhino (which is a whole lot harder to put down than a griz) because he couldn't shoot his .470 worth a crap. This is also in a day where there were no premium bullets, everything was cup and core. Well placed shots always beats brute power.

Not only will a Barnes TSX from a .308 get the job done, but I contend that most people can sufficiently shoot a .308 much better than they can shoot a .338.

There's not much in North America that's bigger than a Moose. Yet the most common moose gun in Scandinavia is the 6.5x55 Swede; again, with a cup and core bullet. In Scandinavia they have to pass shooting tests to hunt, so that's probably why they have such great success with the 6.5x55. And those shooting tests don't employ a bench. American riflemen spend WAY too much time at the bench.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,882 Posts
To ALL,

Fwiw, I wouldn't be afraid to take any animal in the Americas with my .300SAV, loaded with 180grain JSP inside 200m. - Yes, even the BIG bears.
(Magnum calibers are UNNECESSARY here.)

yours, sw
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,727 Posts
Geez. The rifle the OP describes was invented in the '40's: the AK-47.

Serious caliber, truck-gun tough, plentiful ammo, and cheap.

If it was me I'd spend a little more and get an AR-10, but that wasn't the question.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,882 Posts
Captain Gyro,

Or even better, the Simonov SKS, which seems to be fault-free, as a cheap truck-gun.

yours, sw
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,678 Posts
Well now that we've gone completely outside of the .270/30-06 the OP was originally talking about...

In Arkansas the preferred "truck gun" was a .223 bolt rifle of some sort. Good for everything on up to deer. No recoil, easy to shoot, and ammo is cheap. Really hard to beat the .223 for small to medium game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
remember the sks or the ak must be kept fastidiously CLEAN- the sks sells for less than 200 cdn- the ak is prohibited- but either one can slam-fire if gummed up or if a piece of carbon gets in the firing pin channel- in addition, the sks can do the full auto thing if you put the firing pin in upside down- we had one re-merchandiser selling the sks for 75 bucks if you bought another gun-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
what the heck is with this auto correct ?- I put in spitzer and it comes out spritzer- I DO know the difference between the two
one's a drink, the other's a bullet form.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,055 Posts
FWIW: the 7mm mag is a lot of noise but really isn't a heavy hitter. But a well placed shot from it with the right bullet will take anything in North America.

I think I could make a pretty good argument for the .260, .243 or .223 but if we include ammo cost and availability the .223 wins hands down. There are umpteen ARs that would do as truck guns but if the coyotes are very far away a bolt action might be better.

I have had exceptional performance from several Savages and would look there first.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,882 Posts
Charlie Petty,

YEP.= Otoh, I'll stick with my .330SAV, Remington Model 760 for most everything.

yours, sw
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top