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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so im 18. i've always wanted a Garand of my own and now im about to actually own one. i have been reading up on a bunch of the forums and im slowly getting my facts in order, so bare with me :D

but my question is that....is it alright to use regular off the shelf ammo? or should i try to find something else? i would really like to know, cuz i have always wanted a Garand and would hate to ruin it cuz i got the wrong kind of ammo. (i know it takes 30-06 bullets...im just not sure if off teh shelf ammo is ok or not). Thanks alot and i look forword to some good advice :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you tons Joe. i will see what i can do with the CMP, but is it better to get ammo from them? like, is using off the shelf ammo from some department store like wal-mart not good for the older rifles? im just confused...

But thank you for the link :D
 

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Garands are very specific about ammo. If you use rounds with a powder that is too slow you could bend or even break an operating rod. I think most commercially available store stock is not recommended but don't quote me on that. I either use handloads or CMP bullets.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ahhhh, yeah. Deffinatly dont want to do anything to damage it.. So ill be buying from CMP. Maybe ill get into reloading shells when im more comfortable haha.

I really apperciate all the help. I just really want to take care of this amazing piece of history.
 

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Make absolutely sure whatever you buy is real-deal military-specification .30 rifle ammo. There is some put out by commercial makers, but you will probably have to go to a dedicated gun shop to find it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think im going to get my first 100 something rounds from the CMP then do some reloads with the spent brass.

ill read up on how to reload spent casings too.
 

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Joe Forte said:
Get the CMP stuff and you are safe. Not hard to qualify.
Good point, of course. Problem is, for some, CMP may not be practical.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thing is, for me buying from The CMP is my only option for now, and until i go to local gun stores and ask what they have. and to me they seem like a reliable place to go (this could be beacuse im new to this :lol: )
 

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Jcovill125 said:
thing is, for me buying from The CMP is my only option for now, and until i go to local gun stores and ask what they have. and to me they seem like a reliable place to go (this could be beacuse im new to this :lol: )
Go for it! Options are always nice, as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If it is ok with you guys, I'd like to post some pictures when I finaly get my Garand. But that won't be for awhile. I feel like I should share it with you guys!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Private sale. Actually my Dad and I trying to work out a deal with him. We own a carpet store and we're installing his carpet, so we're going to try to knowck off a couple hundred dollers off his instal and bring the price of the Garand down a bit. Maybe around 300.
 

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Get all the ammo you can from CMP. Garand chambers generally run quite large and the rifle is rough on brass thusly you may only get five to eight reloads.

You gotta remember the design was oriented to utilize FMJ bullets and not soft point. I have never had any problem with soft point feeding but a round nose bullet might not cooperate.

With factory ammo I would go with 150 gr range and no heavier than 165 gr.

There is a large variety of powders and bullets that could be used as you gain more knowledge but for right now stay with the 150 FMJ and save your brass.

Another thing to remember when you start loading. Stay off the heavy bullets and stay off the max loads and slower burning propellants. Garands are notorius for warping op rods to the point they drag on the guide at end of buttstock. Once they warp and start contacting it you will get into harmonic problems and groups will open up rapidly.

They are also designed to operate in a min to max port pressure range of 8000 to 11,000 lbs. Keep your loads where they will just operate the system and you will be blessed with a long life.

Most important thing is to protect the muzzle while cleaning it. One pass with the wrong cleaning rod technique and you can destroy the accuracy.

What is accuracy? Acceptance on them was 5" at 100 yards with ball ammo. With good handloads you could achieve 3" at 200 yards. I checked my notes and 49 gr. 4895 with Sierra 150 gr. FMJ was very good in my rifle.

Store it muzzle down with Mobil 1 synthetic motor oil dripped on the op rod so it goes down in gas cylinder. As well if you can get a adjustable gas plug and vent off all the gas pressure you can out the front which will cut your carbon deposits drastically.

One of mine is a Tanker and it took off gas pressure 6" closer to chamber than standard rifle and when I got it it was overdriving the bolt. It had a new barrel and I wanted to shoot 150 thru 173 gr bullets so I made a stainless gas plug and vented it with number drills getting progressively larger. Finally I got it to where 150 and 173 will eject between 1:00 and 2:00 which is what they were designed to deliver.

I worked up a load that gave about 8000 lbs using Quick Load but I still vented the plug.

You must remember it was designed as a battle rifle to work in sub zero cold, mud, rain, etc and to achieve reliable function it had to be driven hard which is hard on the system.

You also must be aware they were only required to be able to fire 6000 rounds in QA inspection testing.

I just got one put together to shoot the Garand matches and I will be looking for a good load that just barely operates the action which will also give me longer barrel life. I got one of the CMP barrels they just sold off. I had two good barrels but when I had a chance to get new ones I knew the whole history on I jumped at it. The others I will just wait till I get a real dog and put one on them.

You can make a muzzle protector by taking a 30.06 case, chucking it in lathe and drilling out base and necking it down in a 7/08 FL die with no expander. This will allow you to slide it over cleaning rod and the neck section goes in muzzle to protect it from cleaning rod contact.

Lower pressue loads will also give a longer muzzle life as well as throat life. With lower pressure loads you could conceivably take a barrel to 15,000 rounds if you care for it properly and cleaning it while warm to remove all the carbon while it is soft.
 

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Jcovill125,

CONGRADS on the new-to-you Garand!

my experience over the last 4 decades with hunting with M1 Garands is that you'll be FINE with ANY of the major makers 150 grain stand velocity/softpoint loads. - my personal favorite is the Remington 150grain JSP.
(trust me, a deer won't know that your load was an "old school" UNfancy round from wally world.)

you might also look into finding yourself a 1917 "American Enfield" P17. - that WWI-era boltgun will happily swallow most any reasonable load w/o a hitch. - fwiw, my brother-of-the-heart, C.E. Harris, even loads me a SMALL GAME load for mine. = 6grains of Bullseye or Unique behind a 140 grain flatnose cast bullet is PURE DEATH on squirrels/rabbits/etc, W/O ruining almost any edible meat & it's GREAT practice for deer season, too.
(set your sights for 600yards & be dead on at 50 yards!)

my CHEAP hunting load for the P17 is a 208grain cast flatnose lead bullet at about 1600FPS & it's a KILLER on medium size game, too.

BEST WISHES.

yours, sw
 

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I'd get an adjustable Schuster Plug

The CMP has the best price around for Garand food, and it's made for Garand's. Your not that far away from the North Store in Ohio, time for a road trip! By the way, ammo prices at the CMP will be going up soon.

As Hummer suggested, I too would advise you to consider a gas adjustable plug. With these you can adjust them, vent excess gas/pressure off while using commercial ammo or heavier bullets without fear of damaging the rifle.

Midway has the Schuster Plug sale right now for $30, here's a link
DCM Adjustable Gas Plug Wrench M1 Garand Steel Parkerized

I would also suggest replacing at least the op-rod spring, who knows how old the one in the rifle is? During recoil, the bolt stops it's rearward travel by striking the heal of the receiver. Pull the stock off, flip her over and take a look at the underside of the receiver, you'll see the area where the bolt strikes.

I replaced the springs and installed the Schuster plugs in each of my Garand's, figure I'd give my 60 year old rifles a little bit of a break. Cracked heels on Garand's in not common, but boy I'd feel broken hearted if I cracked on of my six digit rifles, so I'll take all the advantages I can get.

Orion-7 makes about the best op-rod springs around, made from stainless and they are only $8. I would also replace the clip latch spring $1 and clip ejector spring $3.50 Here's a link to Orion-7 Garand parts page for the springs
M1 Garand Parts

And don't forget the en bloc's
M1 Garand Accessories

If you need a couple to get started, shoot me a PM, I have some I can spare. ;)

Good luck, have fun and please share some eye candy pics of her!
 

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jcoville125,

well, how's the Garand shooting?

btw, my "small game load" for my P-17 is "dead on" with the sights set for 600 yards at 60 yards. and it is "squirrel-killer" without par with little edible meat damaged.
(sorry that i forgot to tell everyone the sight setting. - it took us a while & numerous rounds to get it RIGHT! - my setting should at least get you on the paper.)

yours, sw
 
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