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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a S&W MP15. It functioned fine first time out but this time it jammed and I can't get the bolt open or the charging handle to release.
I read that the "Sports" need to run wet-bolts but I can't get the dang thing to release....HELP:confused::confused:
 

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Opening methods:

1. Hold the rifle with the muzzle pointing in a safe direction and rest the butt against your chest.
Grip both sides of the operating handle and pull sharply and HARD.

2. Rest the butt on the ground with the muzzle pointing upward and in a safe direction. Bump the butt on the ground as you pull on the handle.

3. Last resort:
Push the disassembly pins and separate the upper from the lower.
Get some sheet brass or plastic shim stock and put a piece on the receiver just below the chamber area on the flat spot directly under the feed ramps.
This is to protect the receiver.
Get a flat blade screwdriver and round off the sharp edges and corners of the blade.
Insert the blade between the chamber and the bottom-front of the bolt carrier.
Rest the driver shank on the brass or plastic protector you have on the receiver, and use the driver as a lever to force the bolt carrier to the rear by tilting the driver forward toward the muzzle.

3A. Another last resort.
Separate the receivers.
Look up inside the receiver from the bottom side. Look at the rear of the bolt carrier. Hopefully it's a M16 type carrier that has the bottom rear exposed in the slot.
Have a buddy hold the upper steady on a table WELL PADDED with towels.
If possible, remove any rear sight.
Get a drift made of nylon or heavy rectangular brass bar stock about 1"x1/2"x 6" long.
Rest the drift against the exposed bottom-rear of the bolt carrier which you can see in the bottom of the slot in the upper receiver.
Tap the drift with a hammer to gently tap the carrier to the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
IT WORKED! Thanks!!! Why does it continue to jam while empty tho? Is this something inherit with S&W sport?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, the Bear ammo must not cycle real well. There was a spent case stuck up in there. Thanks again DFariswheel! U Da Man! I always tell my grandson "don't play with it like its your girlfriends boobies! Manhandle that thing! I shoulda listen to myself
 

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Steel case ammo either works sort of okay, or it causes problems.

The problem is, steel ammo doesn't work well in American weapons due to the more straight walled chambers.
Russian weapons and ammo have more tapered chambers and cases, and since steel isn't as elastic as brass, it doesn't expand and spring back as well. You often have problems with extraction, and cases stuck in the chamber.

It comes down to whether it works in a specific weapon.

Here's some very interesting info on steel ammo in the AR-15 rifle.
Unlike the usual internet arguing about personal results with a couple of thousand rounds, these people really tested it.

http://www.luckygunner.com/labs/brass-vs-steel-cased-ammo/
 

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Interesting. I've shot a fair amount of steel through my SU16 (the manual of which says 'No Steel', BTW) without a problem. Of course, I don't 'torture' my guns, either. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good to know. The first time out I ran mixed mags. With out FTF or FTE. This time strictly steel and I had 3 or 4 FTF and FTE. There maybe some truth to this..thanks DWheel
 

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Good magazines can help, but Federal Brass has a tendency to work.
I am wondering about quality control on some barrels and chambers lately, anyone seen some over done plating?
Geoff
Who notes it might have been preservative in the chamber but it was one of a low-end sample I looked over. The S&W M&P OR is still the front runner.
 

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Ammo QC is reportedly suffering at some points, guns could be too, if production pace has been up at high levels for a while.

Could the chamber be polished or would that ruin some chrome plating it might have?

The simplest solution is probably to shoot brass cased ammo, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
yea, or keep Break-free handy at all times! lol
 

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One thing I learned long ago is ALWAYS clean chamber with brush well any time before and after using steel cased ammo.
I clean well any time I shoot any type ammo.
Always PM your AR and you stand less chance of hangup or jams.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I do, thanks..I learned to run it very wet too...
 

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Which is counterintuitive.

For years and years we've been told not to over lubricate an AR, especially in dusty or sandy conditions because the lube will "attract" dirt and cause it to jam.

After many years in the Sandbox the military has learned that in sandy and dusty conditions you add MORE lube to keep it running.
We've learned, that in fact, you cannot over-lubricate an AR. If there's an excess of lube, the rifle will simply blow it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Which is counterintuitive.

For years and years we've been told not to over lubricate an AR, especially in dusty or sandy conditions because the lube will "attract" dirt and cause it to jam.

After many years in the Sandbox the military has learned that in sandy and dusty conditions you add MORE lube to keep it running.
We've learned, that in fact, you cannot over-lubricate an AR. If there's an excess of lube, the rifle will simply blow it out.
Right-on DFWheel, we preached the same apostasy at the range..."clean it, lube it then wipe it off and leave a film only". WRONG....run it wet!
 

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Which is counterintuitive.

For years and years we've been told not to over lubricate an AR, especially in dusty or sandy conditions because the lube will "attract" dirt and cause it to jam.

After many years in the Sandbox the military has learned that in sandy and dusty conditions you add MORE lube to keep it running.
We've learned, that in fact, you cannot over-lubricate an AR. If there's an excess of lube, the rifle will simply blow it out.
Interesting how technology adapts differently at different times to extreme conditions ....
In WW2 it was found that the Thompson was generally reliable except that in the North African Campaign where there was also dusty, sandy conditions the weapon was effected by the conditions just as the AR-15 series is today.
Complicating the issue was that the early version of the Thompson, the 1928, had a built in "oiler," a U shaped piece of metal at the rear of the receiver with two rather stiff clothlike pads on the tips of the U which was covered with lubricating oil. The reciprocation of the bolt maintained constant lubrication of the gun in operation. Like today this tended to pick up fine dirt and cause jams. The M1 and M1A1 versions omitted this oiler and generally proved more reliable. But both guns benefited when soldiers using them learned to use their pencils to "lube" the gun. The graphite worked very well and did not cause dust to stick to the bolt. IIRC the oiler in the '28 version was either removed or cut down so as to be inoperative as an oiler.

I wonder if graphite would work as well in an M4 in Iraq today ....
 

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Isn't a graphite-based lube issued for extreme-cold conditions?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Shep, that makes perfect sense to me... never have used it though. anyone else?
 

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I've read very specific warnings NOT to EVER use graphite on aluminum.
Something to do with the graphite causing major damage to aluminum.
It might have to do with graphite increasing electrolysis between aluminum and steel eating the metal up.

Among the warnings I've heard was to not use a graphite anti-seize compound on AR-15 barrel thread assemblies.

A possible indication of all this is that the military no longer use or recommend graphite in arctic conditions.
 

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Good info, dfariswheel! What's the current GI arctic lube?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Good looking out DF! Interesting info. Never would have put that together. I'm like Shep, wonder what they are using now?
 
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