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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to shoot my first John C. Garande match next weekend and could use a little advise so I don't look like a complete moron. I've read the rules on the CMP site about the 10 shot strings of fire. Do I shoot eight-reload and shoot two and then eject the rest or do they make 2 shot clips that I need to get??

I'm going to use a service grade H&R that I got from the CMP store last summer. As far as I can tell it functions correctly spitting the empties out between 2 and 3 o'clock. Do I sight it in for 100 yds and then raise the rear sites xxxx number of clicks or should I have it zero'd for 200 yds to start with??

Sorry I'm a complete rookie at this type of shooting. I shoot mostly IDPA style pistol matches.

Thanks

Denny
 

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I'm not sure how it's done now, but way back when dirt was new one loaded two rounds- it can be done with a normal clip and a little luck-but I think there are two round clips now. Then a normal reload.

Sight settings typically begin and the first range of the match so if you start at 100 you go up from there but you'll need to shoot your rifle to learn the sight changes.
 

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These usually start off by loading two rounds, then re-loading with a full clip.
You can buy or even alter a standard clip to hold two rounds or you can load the old way:
With the bolt open, drop an empty clip in the magazine.
Insert two rounds and push them into the magazine until the bolt will close and chamber the first round.
This usually takes two hands, and you should practice with some dummy rounds.

For sighting in the M1, you have two choices of aiming and two choices of setting the sights.

First, you have to decide how you want to aim the rifle, with the hunter and combat shooters center of the target, or the target shooter's 6:00 O'clock hold.

The hunter and combat aim is at the center of the target, the bullet hits where the sights are aimed.

The target shooter's method is to aim at the bottom of the black at 6:00 O'clock, and adjust the sights so the bullets hit the center of the target.
In this method the rifle is actually shooting high.
This is the best method for target shooting because it's easier to align the sight precisely with the target if the target appears as a black circle sitting on top of the front sight post.

Next, you have to decide how you want to adjust the sights, the hunter and combat shooter's method or the target shooter's method.

The hunter and combat method is the military method in which you sight in the rifle at 100 yards, then adjust the rear sight elevation drum so the 100 yard mark is aligned with the index line on the sight base.
To do this, sight in the rifle at 100 yards using either sighting method listed above.
Once you're on target, hold the elevation drum tightly with some padded pliers and loosen the elevation drum screw.
Pull the drum outward to disengage the drum from the adjusting mechanism and rotate it until the 100 yard line aligns with the index line on the sight base.
Hold the drum in position with the padded pliers and tighten the screw down tight.
The rifle is now combat sighted in for any range.
If you want to shoot at 400 yards, simply rotate the elevation drum until the 400 yard line aligns with the index line. The same for any range.

A more precise method is the target shooter's method, sometimes used by military marksmen.
In this method you sight in the rifle at 100 yards, again using either of the aiming methods. Once you're on target, simply lower the sight, counting clicks until it's bottomed out.
Write the number of clicks down in your score book or whatever.
Whenever you want to shoot at 100 yards, simple lower the sight all the way then raise it the number of clicks you've written down.
Using this method you have to sight in the rifle at every range you want to shoot at and record the clicks needed to get the rifle on target at that range.

This method allows more precise shooting then the combat method of using the elevation drum marks, but you have to count clicks for each range, and in a fast moving combat or hunting situation where the range can change quickly, you won't have time to count clicks.
Also, if you loose the paper you recorded the click adjustments on, you'll have to try to remember all the settings.

So, if you intend to use your M1 as a hunting or defense rifle, you'd be best to use the center of target hold and set up the sights so you can use the elevation drum marks to adjust for different ranges.

If you intend to use it for mostly target shooting, use the 6:00 O'clock hold and just ignore the sight markings. Count clicks to adjust the sights.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for the replies. I think I need to spend some quality time with my Garand for a few evenings.

I'll probably use the 6 o'clock hold as that's how I have my pistols set. Do you recall how large diameter the black is on the target??

Denny
 

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Well, the way we did it in the Marines way back when was the following.

Only time we ever loaded more than one round was for a rapid fire sequence where we loaded two rounds with an eight round clip close at hand.
All other shots were done by loading only one round at a time.

Starting at the 200 yd line we found our first zero setting. We never looked at the sight
elevation wheel numbers, etc. We were taught only to count clicks for each different yardage. We were also taught to bottom out the elevation as we moved to the next line and reset the elevation again, by counting clicks. The range officer usually told us how much windage to put in. One click at 200 yards was 2", one click at 300 yard was 3" and one click at 500 yards was 5", etc., etc.

Bolt was ALWAYS locked back at the range. That included marching to and from the range
and even when stored in the rifle racks in the barracks. Penalty for having a closed bolt was quite severe.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just a quick update....

I shot a 309 today at the match which is good enough to get me next to last. I do have to admit that it was fun. The hardest stage for me was the sitting. There was just too much wobble the way I was positioned. The good thing was the ole Springfield never missed a beat.

But on the bright side, this opens up many Christmas present suggestions to the wife and kids..... leather shooting coat.. big ole glove for the left hand..sling..... shooting mat..... spotting scope... the list goes on.

Thanks again for the suggestions.

Denny
 

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Leather shooting coats are history. Everything now is cordura nylon and they are quite rugged. I have had three leather coats and two cordura which are superior.

Check out Creedmoor for good coats, mats, gloves etc. Their stuff is designed by shooters.

Insofar as loading they don't allow two round clips any more. You now load empty clip, two rounds UNDER THE BOLT and drop the bolt on empty chamber. You sit down for rapid fire and pull the bolt all the way to the rear and let go and get with the program.
You always fire two then eight with Garand, M1A, AR etc. With bolt guns they go 5 and 5. Bolt guns ammo is loaded in mag and bolt is not closed till the sitting or prone position is attained in rapid fire stages.

There is a nice range down at Malvern, Ohio to use. There is a range/club at Oak Harbor, Ohio as well. Camp Perry is only available for like two matches a year. The national championships and one other as I was told at Perry a couple weeks ago. By the way they had a ton of Garands in the store there for sale in all conditions and price ranges.

You are welcome to PM me with other questions. I went to Camp Perry first time in 1957 so I have been around the block a few times or as Rambo says, "I've fired a few shots." haha.
 

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Leather shooting coats are history

Not necessarily. Some shooters are going back to leather.
My buddy is a President's 100 shooter and he recently bought a leather coat to replace his nylon coat.
I forgot the reasons why he changed, but he did so on the recommendation of Tubb.
 
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