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While there is some cause for concern, I doubt that this one small smelting operation was providing all of the lead needed for domestic bullet production.

Another thing to keep in mind: one of the industries the Left considers a darling of the "Green" movement is electric automobile production, and the manufacture of all those batteries requires massive amounts of lead.

My guess would be that the only impact of this plant closing will be a small increase in the amount of smelted lead floating into our ports from foreign producers.
 

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The good captain is right again.

I checked with a good source in the industry and they consider it a non-event since the majority of lead used in ammo is imported anyhow
 

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The good captain is right again.

I checked with a good source in the industry and they consider it a non-event since the majority of lead used in ammo is imported anyhow
Good to know, Charlie. Thanks for the info!:thumbsup:
 

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Thanks guys. I feel better. Well, kinda...

...little bummed by what I thought was my "common sense". :rolleyes:

I had no idea that most of the ammo industry's lead was imported already. I really gotta start Googling this stuff or something. :oops:
 

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Irish Cop,

As long as my "brothers of the heart" and I are breathing, there WILL be lead smelting in TX & WV.
(The devil made me do it. = CHUCKLE)

yours, sw
 

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The Sierra website notes that most lead used in bullet production was recycled anyway. Apparently, that type of operation isn't affected. Does, however, have national security implications. Someone needs to kick EPA into contact with the real world.
 

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The company basically has been moving it operation down to Mexico over the past few year as they have known for quiet sometime that they had no plans to upgrade the plant to meet EPA standards deadline.

Here is an article that appeared in Accurate Shooters back around Nov. 1 and it explain that this is basically a non event as far as ammo is concerned. To the employees and the local economy well that's a different story.

Last U.S. Lead Smelter Closes - Will This Affect Bullet Production? « Daily Bulletin
 

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Another thing to keep in mind: one of the industries the Left considers a darling of the "Green" movement is electric automobile production, and the manufacture of all those batteries requires massive amounts of lead.

Captain from what I have heard in our industry(auto) is that most of that lead is smelted in China and then sent to Japan for the manufacturing of those electric car batteries.Hence part of the reason batteries have increased 80-100% since 2008 with prices stabilizing since maybe 2010/11 for the most part.The electric car batteries use quite abit of lead and when people started buying them the price of lead went up but did it really need to?The word to us was that a shortage existed globably but could it be like oil with spectulators?As for the EPA all those a**wipes are is an offical Mafia long arm of the gubernment!!
 

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One sure way to tell if a commodity is scarce is to see what the markets are doing. A quick check of the commodities market for industrial metals shows no alarming upswing in the prices; it would appear that the lead market is relatively stable. No one seems to think that they will make big profits investing in a future price increase.
 

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The electric car batteries use quite abit of lead and when people started buying them the price of lead went up but did it really need to?
I don't know the details, since I wasn't paying attention at the time, but it was probably not unreasonable for the growing popularity of electric cars to cause an increase in lead prices. When the demand for a commodity suddenly increases, and supply remains relatively constant, price inevitably goes up.

What usually happens then is that, at the new higher price, it becomes profitable to pursue methods of production that were not previously attractive. As these new sources come on-line, supply gradually catches up with demand again, and the price stabilizes.

In one sense, the increased demand for lead-acid batteries may bode well for us shooters. All those batteries will wear out and have to be recycled; you may be firing Prius remnants into a berm someday.:thumbsup:

Another potentially positive development: as lithium-ion batteries gradually replace lead-acid, demand for lead may go down. You know what that means for prices.
 

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Regardless odumbo and his henchmen at the EPA have put more people out of work with their drive to save the world from the alleged problems of global warming.

The smoke will continue to go into the air just not in this country. He does nothing about the unemployment here except extend benefits for those unemployed. Three more years of this moron IF the country lasts.
 
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