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A pair of Alabama conservation enforcement officers think they've come up with the perfect way for avid hunters to honor their loved ones for eternity.

Officers Thad Holmes and Clem Parnell have launched Holy Smoke LLC, a company that will, for a price, load cremated human ash into shotgun shells, and rifle and pistol cartridges.

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Methinks Hunter Thompson would have loved the idea.

Are these ash-loaded cartridges intended to be shot? If so, are ashes abrasive? For some reason I'm under the impression that some of them are sort of sand-like, though I really have no idea. :confused:
 

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Even if they were how many would you have to shoot to be a problem?

I guess the bulk of the ash would be calcium carbonate that should be pretty benign.

One of my heroes... the late Pete Dickey was shot out of a civil war cannon. I call that going out in style.
 

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The "Colorado Viking" funeral of Hunter Thompson:

On August 20, 2005, in a private ceremony, Thompson's ashes were fired from a cannon atop a 153-foot (47 m) tower of his own design (in the shape of a double-thumbed fist clutching a peyote button) to the tune of Norman Greenbaum's "Spirit in the Sky" and Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man."[35] Red, white, blue, and green fireworks were launched along with his ashes. As the city of Aspen would not allow the cannon to remain for more than a month, the cannon has been dismantled and put into storage until a suitable permanent location can be found. According to his widow Anita, Thompson's funeral was financed by actor Johnny Depp, a close friend of Thompson. Depp told the Associated Press, "All I'm doing is trying to make sure his last wish comes true. I just want to send my pal out the way he wants to go out."[35]
Source: Wikipedia
 

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I guess the bulk of the ash would be calcium carbonate that should be pretty benign.
Most of the carbon would be burned during the cremation process. Wikipedia states that the composition of cremains consists of dry calcium phosphates with some minor minerals, such as salts of sodium and potassium.
 
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