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I was stationed at Osan 1979-1980, and that's where I first saw (or heard of really) OV-10's. Thought they were just really cool aircraft. I wasn't aware at the time that the USAF even HAD prop driven planes still used for combat ops.

They had four m-60's mounted 2 to a pod, with the pods on each side of the fuselage near the nose, and always had two rocket canisters mounted. Not to mentioned to huge (to me anyway) prop engines.

Just wondered what some of the guys here who really know airplanes though of these "little" close air support/FAC aircraft.

Here's a link to an old Stars and Stripes article.

OV-10 Bronco at Osan Air Base, 1979 - Archive Photo of the Day - Stripes
 

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If you head to google groups and check one called "rec.aviation.military" I bet you will find a couple more people who would also love to talk about the OV-10 there. :)
 

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The OV-10 was a direct result of the Air Force's push for a purpose-built FAC aircraft during the Vietnam war. The first two iterations of FAC planes were off-the-shelf aircraft: the Cessna O-1 Birddog and the Cessna O-2 Skymaster.

The OV-10 Bronco solved a lot of the inadequacies of these two aircraft, with two turboprop engines, guns, and ejection seats.

Not to be outdone, the Army and Marines decided to independently design their own FAC/Observaton aircraft, the OV-1 Mohawk, which was also turboprop-powered. It arrived too late to see much action in SE Asia.

(In 1980 I was approached by an FBI official who was looking for pilots to fly Mohawks along Mexican border on smuggling interdiction missions; I was tempted, but ultimately decided not to take them up on it.)

Eventually the Air Force evolved to all-jet FAC aircraft, first with the OA-37 Dragonfly, and finally using versions of the A-10.
 

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USN had some OV-10s, too, used in their brown water war in SVN.

I still have a 1965 or '66 Popular Science magazine with the OV-10 on the cover. Thought it was cool then and still do.
 

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Back in the late 1990s (IIRC) there was a brief flap when the BATF said they were obtaining OV10 Broncos for, as they put it, "law & order stuff."

This was in the aftermath of the Ruby Ridge atrocity and the Waco, Texas debacle had happened, inspiring an rising of the "patriot/militia" movement and even putatively "middle-of-the-road" Joe Citizen types became rather deeply cynical of federal law enforcement. Shooting a forteen year old boy in the back, a woman carrying a baby and totally botching a raid on a oddball religious sect that results in a lot of children dying tends to sour peoples' outlook on FED LEOs, for some reason.:rolleyes:
Anyway, from what I recall, the reaction caused the BATF to scrap its ideas of obtaining the Broncos ...
...but a few agents might be operating RC helicopters in their backyards ...... :angel::poke::poke::poke: :cryinlaugh: :cryinlaugh: :angel: :angel:

:bolt:​
 

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My best friend and former bunny cop's father flew a Birddog in VN.

I remember him telling us he carried a .45 and occasionally returned fire at "the bastards who were shooting at me - just for the hell of it."

First funeral I ever attended at Arlington.
 

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There's a semi-famous photo of a guy who also got tired of being shot at, and rigged up an M60 to fire sideways, gunship-style, out the back window of his O-1. Effectiveness/results are unknown, but I imagine every time he pulled the trigger (however THAT feat was arranged), he got a hot brass shampoo.
 

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There was a British pilot in WW I who rigged an Enfield rifle on his wing tip with a string to trip the trigger. He would maneuver his plane into position where he could shoot the pilot of the enemy plane. Apparently he killed several pilots that way.

I wish I could remember where I read that story...I want to say it was someone that Stephenson worked for in British Intelligence; but I could be mis-remembering.
 

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North American Rockwell OV-10 Bronco - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The original idea, before the committee finished turning the goat into a camel, was a small, practical replacement for the O-1 and the rest of the WWII style single light planes taken up from trade.

Small enough to land on a road, refuel from a Mogas tanker, and a crew of two, one per engine.

Geoff
Who notes, it didn't work out that way.
 

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My favorite COIN airplanes of the '60s are the T-28D, the B-26K, and the Skyraider in all its various guises, most especially the early gray USAF A-1Es and the VNAF's gray (pre-camo) A-Hs and J.
 

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Kevin Gibson, et. al.,

Fyi, in 1966 (when I was in college) I met (and had, for 4 days as a "house guest") an American Legion "Goodwill Envoy", who had flown with The French Foreign Legion & The Lafayette Escadrille during WWI. He said that he was a college freshman in Paris when the war broke out & volunteered/was enlisted/trained as a pilot in the FFL.
(He was WALKING from San Francisco to Ft Lauderdale at that time.)

He told our Brotherhood meeting (a Baptist men's group) that he was PRESENT on the day that a German pilot threw a paving stone through the upper wing of a French aircraft and that that was the FIRST known "hostile act" between airplanes. He further said that prior to that day that pilots routinely "waved at" each other "in a friendly manner".

He said that by the next Monday that every pilot (that he knew of) was carrying a handgun & that pilots were son firing their handguns at enemy aircraft.
He said that 2 days later a German pilot was "lightly wounded" by a British pilot with a .455 caliber Webley Mk IV revolver.

yours, sw
 
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