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Short simple answer: yes. Airspeed over the wings is independent of tire rotational speed. There are three things that make an airplane fly, and airspeed is all of them.

Realistic answer: no. Tires have limiting rotational speeds above which they explode, sending shrapnel into engine intakes and fuel tanks.
 

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Short simple answer: yes. Airspeed over the wings is independent of tire rotational speed. There are three things that make an airplane fly, and airspeed is all of them.

Realistic answer: no. Tires have limiting rotational speeds above which they explode, sending shrapnel into engine intakes and fuel tanks.
The next time this meme pops up, I will win the internet... :D
 

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Short simple answer: yes. Airspeed over the wings is independent of tire rotational speed. There are three things that make an airplane fly, and airspeed is all of them.

Realistic answer: no. Tires have limiting rotational speeds above which they explode, sending shrapnel into engine intakes and fuel tanks.
How do you get airspeed over the wings if the plane remains stationary? Is the action of the jets enough to create lift without the plane actually moving?
 

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How do you get airspeed over the wings if the plane remains stationary? Is the action of the jets enough to create lift without the plane actually moving?
The Jets push the airplane forward due to thrust.
"For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction."
I believe CaptainGyro's post indicates that in reality, the stresses on the tires would be too high and they would fail and the debris would damage the plane.
The tires on planes aren't there to provide thrust like on a car.
 

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The Jets push the airplane forward due to thrust.
"For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction."
I believe CaptainGyro's post indicates that in reality, the stresses on the tires would be too high and they would fail and the debris would damage the plane.
The tires on planes aren't there to provide thrust like on a car.
I'm not concerned about the tires.

The whole point of the conveyor belt -- as I understand it-- ls that the plane is not moving forward. So, if the plane is stationary, where does air movement over the wings come from?

If the jets provide enough air movement on their own without the plane moving forward then all planes should be able to takeoff from engine provided "airspeed" alone and we wouldn't need long runways.

Put it this way, have you ever pedaled a stationary bike or run on a treadmill? No matter how fast your legs move you aren't going to feel the wind in your face/hair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The whole point of the conveyor belt -- as I understand it-- ls that the plane is not moving forward.
That's the tricky part of the question Ed...it would lead you to believe that the airplane can't move forward. But Tommy has it right.

Think of it this way: if there was a car on the conveyor belt it wouldn't move, since the wheels are drive wheels. They're trying to make the car move forward at say, 100 mph, but the conveyor is moving the other way at 100 mph, cancelling out the velocity. It's essentially a treadmill.

Now, take the car out of gear, and mount a rocket motor on it. It doesn't matter how fast the conveyor goes under the wheels since the wheels aren't what's driving the car. No matter how fast the conveyor goes it's just spinning freely rotating wheels. But that rocket is accelerating the car forward.

Or another example: say you're on a treadmill, but you're wearing roller skates and holding onto the side rails. No matter how fast that tread passes under you it can't drive you backwards. If someone standing on the floor behind you gives you a push, you'll move forward on the treadmill no matter how fast the tread goes.
 

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I figured you'd have a simple answer. At least now when I say "Yes!" I'll know why. ;)

Thanks Cap'n. Thanks Tommy.

That's the tricky part of the question Ed...it would lead you to believe that the airplane can't move forward. But Tommy has it right.

Think of it this way: if there was a car on the conveyor belt it wouldn't move, since the wheels are drive wheels. They're trying to make the car move forward at say, 100 mph, but the conveyor is moving the other way at 100 mph, cancelling out the velocity. It's essentially a treadmill.

Now, take the car out of gear, and mount a rocket motor on it. It doesn't matter how fast the conveyor goes under the wheels since the wheels aren't what's driving the car. No matter how fast the conveyor goes it's just spinning freely rotating wheels. But that rocket is accelerating the car forward.

Or another example: say you're on a treadmill, but you're wearing roller skates and holding onto the side rails. No matter how fast that tread passes under you it can't drive you backwards. If someone standing on the floor behind you gives you a push, you'll move forward on the treadmill no matter how fast the tread goes.
 

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Ever heard:

You can tell a Navigator, by the rings around his chart.

You can tell a Bombardier, by the rings around his eyes.

You can tell a Pilot, but you can't tell them much!
 
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