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Discussion Starter #1
Now I could list several, but I’ll keep my opinion to this one, and maybe chime in on some others if they don’t get hit on.

Which pistol do you whish would have made it to present day, which includes some development of the base pistol design, and of course, chambered in all the popular cartridges?

My first pick:

Polish Radom

The Radom has such outstanding ergonomics and the metallurgy was a slight step ahead of its time. A Radom in .40 would be hone huckuva sweet packin rig; especially if it had a Commander length barrel/slide and an aluminum frame. Of course you’d have to update it for a thumb safety, just to keep the lawyers happy.
 

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I remember when you couldn't give a Radom away but now they are getting popular with collectors. I had one eons ago and it was a good shooter.

The Remington 51 I mentioned should get a vote and I'd put the Whitney Wolverine way high on the list.
 

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Charlie Petty said:
I remember when you couldn't give a Radom away but now they are getting popular with collectors. I had one eons ago and it was a good shooter.
It was actually the Vis, as in DVC, made in Radom, Poland.

As I was entering adulthood, if you couldn't afford a GI 1911, the big surplus store in San Diego had Vis's for $20. A few years ago, a friend was looking for one for his collection. I don't recall if we ever spotted one at any of the Tucson gun shows but I recall checking prices online and they started well over $400.
 

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I wish the Automag were still available, and at a reasonable price (which I don't think it ever was).

The little Beretta 70 in .380 and .22 would be cool to have available again, too. I have one in .22 and IMHO it's superior in every way to the much-heralded Walther PP/PPK series.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think Beretta would say their Model 85 series is the continuation of the Model 70 series. I'm sure they would even say the 85 series is better, but I for one would not agree. The Model 70 was smaller, lighter, thinner, and much more simple. I loved (but most Americans didn't) the cross bolt safety; it was just cool.
 

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Kevin Gibson said:
I think Beretta would say their Model 85 series is the continuation of the Model 70 series. I'm sure they would even say the 85 series is better, but I for one would not agree. The Model 70 was smaller, lighter, thinner, and much more simple. I loved (but most Americans didn't) the cross bolt safety; it was just cool.
Mine has the crossbolt safety; I believe later ones had a 1911-type thumb lever.
 

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Strictly as a niche gun, a Beretta 86 sits in my safe as insurance against the day I may lack the strength for a DA trigger stroke and to rack a slide. It gives me the limited punch of a .380 with a tip-up barrel and the option of 1911-style cocked-and-locked operation. It's a bit large for a .380 but that's probably a plus for a blowback pistol in that chambering.

The gun I considered to be the jewel in the Kahr crown was the P9 Covert, which offered the more concealable grip frame of the PM9, coupled with the "full-length" top end of the P9, for better reliability and a bit more velocity. The market did not seem to agree with me, once the PM9 got debugged.
 

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Of the magnum automatics the Automag was probably the best compared to Coonan and Wildey. The Desert Eagle surely outsold all of them but even though I've got fairly big hands none of them were comfortable.
 

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The Colt Pony comes to mind. Ruger picked up that ball and ran with it, but Colt coulda/shoulda won that game.
 

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I missed my chance to get a Star BKS when they were around. Even Jeff Cooper liked that one (for what it was).
 

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I also have a Beretta 948, a neat little pistol, which is nothing more or less than a .22 version of the M34 or M1934 .380 of WWII fame. In fact, I think the Beretta 70 is nothing more than an updated, modernized version of the 1934.

Haven't shot it for a long time. IIRC, it shoots good groups, but several inches off to one side, and I've never been able to drift the rear sight to compensate--it just won't budge. I seem to recall putting a dot of paint on one side of the rear sight blade to show where to hold the front sight to get a center hit--sort of a cheap version of a two-dot sight system.

My 70 shoots satisfactorily close to center. :D
 

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Jon Powers' MagMatic prototype looked darned interesting. J.D. Jones and some others wrote it up around thirty years ago. It looked like an overgrown Colt Woodsman, but was chambered for the standard .44 Magnum.
 

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Star PD. First of the light weight compact 45s.
 

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jdh said:
Star PD. First of the light weight compact 45s.
I second the motion.
The PD was an excellent lightweight carry gun, in a very reliable caliber.
Some inner parts, the sear primarily, exhibited occasional heat-treatment problems, and the aluminum frame was lacquered instead of being anodized, but it did the job.
If you want to buy mine, you'll have to ask my widow.
 

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jdh said:
Star PD. First of the light weight compact 45s.
My understanding is that it used a plastic buffer that required periodic replacement. Other than that, I had heard great praise for it and jumped at the chance to fire one that a friend had brought to the range. As I recall, what prompted me to field strip it was to show him that buffer. I don't recall even looking for the buffer once I spotted the crack in the rail on left side of the receiver. I can't speak for all of them but this one appeared to have had the opening for the shaft of the slide release lever cut high enough as to significantly thin the rail at that point.
 

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Snake45 said:
I also have a Beretta 948, a neat little pistol, which is nothing more or less than a .22 version of the M34 or M1934 .380 of WWII fame. In fact, I think the Beretta 70 is nothing more than an updated, modernized version of the 1934.

Haven't shot it for a long time. IIRC, it shoots good groups, but several inches off to one side, and I've never been able to drift the rear sight to compensate--it just won't budge. I seem to recall putting a dot of paint on one side of the rear sight blade to show where to hold the front sight to get a center hit--sort of a cheap version of a two-dot sight system.

My 70 shoots satisfactorily close to center. :D
you're not the only one - i don't know how many times i've thought about buying a 34 to have the "larger brother"- they also came with a target barrel, which most people discarded- just like the astra 38/357/9mm police had an extra cylinder and moomclips
 

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spwenger said:
jdh said:
Star PD. First of the light weight compact 45s.
My understanding is that it used a plastic buffer that required periodic replacement. Other than that, I had heard great praise for it and jumped at the chance to fire one that a friend had brought to the range. As I recall, what prompted me to field strip it was to show him that buffer. I don't recall even looking for the buffer once I spotted the crack in the rail on left side of the receiver. I can't speak for all of them but this one appeared to have had the opening for the shaft of the slide release lever cut high enough as to significantly thin the rail at that point.
Mine has neither buffer nor crack.
It came bufferless from the factory. It is crackless because I carry it more than shoot it.
I am aware of its potential faults, but it is so light and handy that it puts me in a forgiving mood.

The gunsmith who tuned it and gave it a superlative trigger job warned me about the heat-treatment problem, the result of which is the possibility that its sear is glass-hard all the way through, and might someday break.
 
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