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Miss Chasen, 64, was shot five times in the chest in the early hours of November 16th in Beverly Hills, shortly after leaving the premiere of Burlesque.

The coroner said the nature of the famed publicist's injuries were consistent with being targeted by a professional gunman.
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Detectives confirmed they are looking for a skilled marksman as part of their murder probe.

They believe the gunman fired from a SUV or truck that pulled up alongside Miss Chasen's BMW as she stopped on Sunset Boulevard.
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Former LA detective Gill Carillo told ABC News: 'Normally they turn the gun sideways and this is something that was done with some skill.

'I carried a gun for 38 years and had to fire it quarterly. I don't think I could shoot and hit that mass like that.'

Source
 
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I'm skeptical. It seems unlikely that a professional would attempt a vehicle to vehicle shooting no matter how good a shot he is. A professional would have discarded the gun at the scene and would not have left the victim alive to drive a quarter mile before crashing her BMW. I've read elsewhere that the bullets were 9mm hollowpoints (Some doofus on PBS belabored the hollowpoint aspect as though they were exotic.) This means the spent cases were either ejected inside the shooters vehicle or a 9mm revolver was used. Has anyone seen any reports regarding the type of gun that was used?

I think this was most likely one of the following:
Road rage. Someone got pissed off at her on the roadway.
Gang initiation. Some gang members are former military. Could they be imparting their training to initiates?
Thrill killing. Some rich brat from Beverley Hills, Hollywood, Santa Monica, Westwood, Brentwood or Bel Aire couldn't find anything better to do.
 

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If you pull up next to her drivers window to drivers window. What is the distance? 6 feet? Wow. You really need to be a pro to hit a six inch circle at six feet. MSM are clearly morons for swallowing this crap, and the officer quoted needs to be suspended and sent down for retraining IF the quote was accurate.
 

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'Normally they turn the gun sideways and this is something that was done with some skill.'

That is the real laugher. :roll:
Note is that the clown is a former detective. If this is an example of his detecting skills, its easy to understand...
 

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I think his comment was taken out of context. I think he was addressing the question of if this could have been a car-jacking gone bad. I think he was pointing out that the car jackers don't use good technique or achieve this type of results.
 

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Good point, Tim.
 

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“Professional” hits with firearms are so rare, I’m amazed that anyone can say with a straight face what a “professional” hit man would or wouldn’t do with his/her firearm. Can anyone point me to any sort of scholarly work on the subject so I could make a determination whether the shooter was a "professional" or just a murderous felon who knows how to shoot well?

I think the more astute observation would be, “The shooter in this case, seems to have mastered basic marksmanship, and is able to apply his/her skill in the real world”

I shudder to think that (God forbid) I ever shoot someone and display competence at arms that someone would label me a “professional” killer.
 

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'I shudder to think that (God forbid) I ever shoot someone and display competence at arms that someone would label me a "professional" killer.'--Kevin Gibson

That reminds me of the (specious) statement that Br'er Mas "teaches people how to get away with murder".
 

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Yeah, that one really angered me, because Mas is one of the best examples of what a gun writer ought to aspire to be. Whether it be content, style, technical merit, technical knowledge, legal knowledge, experience or ETHICS as a writer; Mas is, and always has been an outstanding example of the best our industry has to offer.
 

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Kevin Gibson said:
Yeah, that one really angered me, because Mas is one of the best examples of what a gun writer ought to aspire to be. Whether it be content, style, technical merit, technical knowledge, legal knowledge, experience or ETHICS as a writer; Mas is, and always has been an outstanding example of the best our industry has to offer.
+1 on all that, my friend. And he delivers it all with good humor, too.
 

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Snake45 said:
Kevin Gibson said:
Yeah, that one really angered me, because Mas is one of the best examples of what a gun writer ought to aspire to be. Whether it be content, style, technical merit, technical knowledge, legal knowledge, experience or ETHICS as a writer; Mas is, and always has been an outstanding example of the best our industry has to offer.
+1 on all that, my friend. And he delivers it all with good humor, too.

Mas would have been a leader in whatever field he chose--law, medicine, politics, entertainment, business, motivational speaking, whatever. We are indeed fortunate he chose as his life's work the line he did.
 

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I remember reading about the Chicago Mob and its actions in the 50's and 60's and one of the "contributors' who was doing time for laundering money was pretty clear in saying that there was no such thing as a "hit man" in the hollywood sense. I got the feeling from the book that he was glad Hollywood had made such a thing up, because it got people thinking and it was more propaganda than truth. If you got the people scared, then the real thing was needed even less than before. He commented on the use of the .22 not as a skillful shooters choice, but as a way to keep the mess down. IIRC the statement was something like "you blows a guy's head all to pieces in the car, its pretty hard to get that cleaned up, you put two .22's in his ear, ya got no blood on the upholstery."
 

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guntotin_fool said:
He commented on the use of the .22 not as a skillful shooters choice, but as a way to keep the mess down. IIRC the statement was something like "you blows a guy's head all to pieces in the car, its pretty hard to get that cleaned up, you put two .22's in his ear, ya got no blood on the upholstery."
I recently watched a show on TV about the assassination of Gerald Bull, and some intel type guy said the assassination was amateurish because the shooter used a suppressed 9mm instead of a .22; the comment was framed in the context of the Mossad's preference for the .22 (extolling all the .22's virtues as an assignation weapon).

So because it wasn't a precisely placed shot with a .22 to the head, the hitter supposedly wasn't a professional. I couldn't contain my outburst of laughter. My wife, sitting in a room reading a book, asked what I was laughing about. I told her what they said, and that the comment came at the end of the story, after they had fully detailed out how any number of nations would want him dead, had no idea who did the hit, and that it remained an unsolved case 20 years later…but it was amateurish.

No idea who pulled it off…now THAT sounds professional. Choice of weapon is immaterial if you're professional enough to pull that off.
With this line of thinking, if the hit had been a precisely placed shot to the head with a .22 and they caught the guy who did it; they would be praising his professionalism, before sending him off to prison.

I wonder if the writers noticed that their show was a study in irony?
 

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Heh. All this "professionalism" sounds good in books and movies, but it's kinda like a "real" spy; they will look and act like anything but, especially if they plan on a long career. The true pro does the job and disappears. If the job looks like a bumbling "amateur", so much the better.
 
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Notice how suddenly, the shooter whose "group" was so "tight" that it was the mark of a "pro", is now an amatuer who acted alone, was riding a bicycle and killed his robbery target for no (apparently) discernable reason, and also (apparently) didn't get any loot from his victim?

"Robberies gone bad" do happen. I'm venting on the press and their "retired LAPD detective" who "carried a gun for 38 years and fired quarterly". This retired detective was somehow privy to photos or copies of coroner notes or some official record which detailed the location and measurements of the bullet strikes.

Do cops talk to retired cops, revealing details about current cases? I think maybe in general terms that might happen, especially if the two are close...ex-partners or something. But once details like that hit the media, I don't think anyone would talk to that retired cop again.
But something about this "source" just smells. Particularly his ability to conduct crime scene investigations.
 

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Charlie Petty said:
Could it be that the source was the "disinformation cowpath"?
:lol: And upon which path we find a plethora of..."pies"?

Seriously, I guess LAPD could've wanted that put out to put the suspect at ease. We don't generally play things that complicated or dramatic, but we're a not as sophisticated as LAPD I suppose.
 

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The article explains, sort of, why no cases were found at the scene.

Apparently, the perp used not a gun but some kind of a "bullet pump." :roll:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Snake45 said:
The article explains, sort of, why no cases were found at the scene.

Apparently, the perp used not a gun but some kind of a "bullet pump." :roll:
Yes, and the SUV morphed into a bicycle.

Obviously, the Transformers are among us... :)
 
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