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I've shown this pic a few times before, showing the horribly bubba-ed Enfield No. 5 Jungle Carbine I bought at a yard sale a couple years ago for $75:



The gun came with no bolt head, and didn't have a magazine in it when I first saw it. The seller rummaged around in a box of junk that contained several Enfield mags and gave me one, which fit the gun. Later, upon close examination, the SN of the rifle was engraved on the mag, so it's the original one to the gun!

The one irreversible, unforgivable thing Bubba had done to the little rifle was hacksaw or grind off the original rear sight mount. Ouch, that's gonna leave a mark! The sight had been replaced with a click-adjustable Lyman, which, near as I can tell, is worth about what I paid for the whole rifle.

Fortunately for me, I didn't care all that much about restoring the thing to stock. Back sometime in the 1973-75 timeframe, I'd seen an article in Gun World magazine where someone had taken a No. 5 and "sporterized" it with a Fajen stock. He ended up with a damn nice looking little rifle, one that stuck in my mind. So that's what I'd do with my Bubba Special.

Checking headspace using the bolt head from my stock No. 4 (#1 head), it seemed to be a bit generous, so I set about to find the longest bold head possible. No #3s were to be had, but I did find a pair of #2s for $25 (both!) on eBay (my No. 4's headspace also seemed to be generous, so both would be put to use). Haven't shot the gun yet but I think it'll be okay, especially if I make some fire-forming handloads and then neck-size from then on, letting it headspace on the case shoulder like a real rifle. :wink:

Spent a year or two looking for one of those sharp Fajen stocks, but no joy. So I bought a plastic sporter replacement at a gun show for $35. Later, a forum member here sold me a nice wooden Sile stock, also IIRC for $35 plus shipping. The gun looks great in the wood stock and handles as sweetly as any rifle I've ever handled. The black plastic one isn't quite as nice looking but the shape is almost identical, it still handles well, and it's knock-around tough.





Somewhere along the line, it occurred to me that what I have is something darn close to a "scout rifle." Contrary to popular belief, the defining quality of a "scout rifle" is NOT a forward-mounted scope (with backup "ghost ring" iron sights), but that it be a full-powered (check!) rifle no more than 1 meter (39 inches) long and weighing no more than 6.6 or 7 pounds, depending on which set of figures you believe. Bubba here easily makes length; with the plastic stock it tips my bathroom scale right at 7 pounds. (I wish I'd weighed it last time I had the wood on it, as I think the plastic is actually heavier than the wood). The Lyman sight is missing its fine aperture, so I actually DO have a "ghost ring" sight on it. Oh, the receiver is also drilled and tapped (4 holes) for a side scope mount. Might pick one of those up if I find one cheap sometime.

I've got the dies and all the components to reload for it, so it's just a matter of sitting down and actually DOING so. Might get to it this year.

One thing I would like to get is a chopped magazine. The long GI mag just doesn't look right on the little rifle anymore (so I left it out of the later pictures).

It's not a world-beater, but it has been a fun project and I only have about $175 in it, including both stocks (but not counting the reloading dies and stuff). The little beast is beginning to grow on me. Should make a good "truck gun" or "trunk gun," don'tcha think?
 

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Some years back I took a Brazilian '98 in 7x57 and due to a bad barrel and Numrich having a sale on FN carbine barrels in that caliber ($35), I built a Scout. The Burris Scout mount was an easy installation on the military barrel, a Leupold handgun scope on top took care of the sights (at my age, I don't do irons), and Ram Line, the stock.

I decided Jeff Cooper was a genius. Light, easy to carry and does 2 MOA upon demand. Would probably do better, but I haven't tried real hard. A couple of local Bubbas who've seen it obviously thought it was wierd. They changed their minds after handling it.

Someone with a good hand on a tig welder could probably shorten a magazine body for you. The spring might be an issue.
 

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Snake;
Don't circumcise that long magazine!
Instead, buy a separate commercial Enfield five-round replacement magazine.
My own "semi-scout" rifle (it's longer and a little heavier than the definition allows), built on a Springfield M1903 barrelled action, sports a "custom-made" 10-round magazine. It's two '03A3 magazine boxes, neatly joined end-to-end and with an added hinged floorplate, with half of a BAR-magazine spring and an '03A3 follower. It loads with two M1903 stripper clips.
Instead of "shoot one, load one," I have always used "shoot five, load five." That way there's always lots of useful stuff in the magazine, just in case. You can do the same with Enfield five-round stripper clips and your standard 10-round box.
Although I've never used my "semi-scout" rifle to hunt, I have a wooden "stuffing block" and an original '03A3 spring-and-follower unit, that instantly converts the 10-round magazine to the legal five-round hunting limit. I just open the floorplate, switch spring assemblies, and add the stuffing block. Your set-up will be simpler: just switch magazines.
 

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Had a fit of industry and did a little work on the thing today.

The bolt handle has always been ugly. Rust brown, with a slight but uniform pitted appearance--it might have originally been sandblasted, I don't know. It just looks like ass and makes the whole gun look like a nasty old antique.

A while back I thought I'd polish it up. Steel wool and wire brush, my ususal rust-removal tools, had no effect whatsoever on the patina. Neither did Naval Jelly, to my amazement! I could have attacked it with files, stones, and sandpapers, but decided that that would just be more work than I wanted to do that particular day.

Today I just degreased the dark part of the bolt handle (leaving the bolt body bare bright metal) and hit it with a couple coats of Duplicolor Satin Black Engine Paint. This is tough stuff, which I've used with good results on a rusty Mossberg shotgun barrel. Much nicer looking now! After I fire the rifle to see if it shoots, I just might paint the whole action and barrel with that stuff.

I think my next job will be to remove the mold-injection seam from the stock. Being a lifelong model builder, I have learned to HATE those seams and I remove them wherever I find them.

I might paint the stock brown, too. Haven't decided yet. I might be better off just leaving it black.
 

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Steve, post a pic of the welded up 1903 magazine that made it a ten rounder. That is a excellent idea.
 

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Hummer;
At the moment, this is the best I've got. Click on it and it gets bigger:

Two '03A3 magazine boxes, the top one still attached to its triggerguard plate, were welded end-to-end and very straight. Although it isn't really necessary, the guy who did the welding added a hinged floorplate, with a spring-loaded catch on the triggerguard. (He also straightened-out one end of the triggerguard bow, and welded it to the magazine box, to make the thing more aesthetically pleasing.)
Inside is an unmodified '03A3 follower, riding on about half of a spring from a BAR magazine. The top end of the BAR-magazine spring was ground a little, so it fit into the spring-holding grooves of the follower.
The bottom of the upper magazine box was removed with a hand-held (Dremel-style) tool's cutoff wheel, as was the triggerguard plate and the bottom of the lower box. Then all of the mating surfaces were ground with hand-held rotary stones.
I did all of the prep work. I can't weld, though.
The finished product works perfectly. I can load with two stripper clips without a problem.
 

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Steve,
Please remove trigger guard and take close up details of the whole assembly from all angles. I am assuming this was a stamped 03A3 trigger guard to start with?
You have me thinking now about welding a BAR mag cut off on top on to the bottom of a stamped 03A3 trigger guard, cutting about 1/3rd the BAR spring off and make it a 20 shooter
 

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Hummer;
Much as I'd love to oblige you, it's Glas-bedded in, the screws are torqued, and I've just sighted it in to a good 300-yard zero (which is all I can get, around here), so I really do not want to take it apart. (I have to go to the mainland, to find a 300-yard range.) But, yes, all of the "bottom end" is '03A3 stamped parts, triggerguard plate on down.
I began my experiments with a BAR magazine, silver-soldered into an '03A3's triggerguard plate. It does not work. Not to my satisfaction, anyway. So my experience may save you from making some false moves.
Using any part of the BAR magazine, the rifle will feed perfectly; but you absolutely cannot load with stripper clips. The BAR box is too narrow to accept incoming cartridges from the wider '03 receiver. You'd have to load 'em in singly.
You might do as one friend of mine did: Modify the '03 receiver and triggerguard plate to accept BAR magazines entire. He did away with the receiver's feed lips, and fitted a new magazine catch. In another iteration, he irremovably attached a BAR magazine (its feed-lips removed) into a Remington bolt rifle, and single-loaded from the top. He used the "shoot one, load one" technique with that rifle, feeding from a butt-mounted elastic cartridge holder. He found that the BAR box was much too easily dented and bent, so he silver-soldered a steel "cage" around it for protection. It worked, but it was pretty heavy.
Another of the things that we found during these experiments was that shooting a bolt-action from low prone with a 20-round magazine installed was not practical. It could be done, but it wasn't conducive to the best marksmanship. A 10-round, double-row box is pretty close to the maximum practical length.
Here are some more photos:

This is the "full monte," bipod extended.

The bipod is half-stowed, so you see how it works.

Here, the bipod is fully stored, to become the fore-end tip. The stock was made by Brent Clifton. (He isn't around any more.)

Pachmayer used to sell this removable-buttpad device, so I adapted it to butt storage. The Glas tubes add stiffness, too.
 

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Yeah I found similar things looking at M14 magazine but there is another option maybe. There is a 10 round mag for a 760/7600/742/7400 made by Checkmate Industries is that is heavy that might just work along these lines.

I have seen the original Springfield 03 that would take a BAR mag and as you say it is big and tends to get in the way.
 

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Hummer said:
...I have seen the original Springfield 03 that would take a BAR mag...
I bet that what you saw was the air-service extension magazine. It attaches to an '03 (but not to an '03A3, of course) in the place of its magazine floorplate, using the rifle's unmodified floorplate latch. I believe the combination holds 25 cartridges.
It was supposed to be for use by a WW1 biplane's rear-seat artillery spotter, in case of attack by a German or Austrian fighter. They were unwieldy, and at the same time ways were found to mount US-made machine guns for observer use, so they were also obsolete ab initio. I don't know how many were made.
They're pretty rare, nowadays, but I last saw one at a gun show ca. 1983, for sale for $25.00. Foolish me: I didn't buy it.

The extension is well-made and very strong. Were you willing to sacrifice one to make a practical extended magazine, I would still counsel cutting it off at the 10-round mark, and reattaching its (solid) bottom to the extension box by means of a weld.
This would give you a 10-round magazine that you could instantly return to five-round configuration for legal hunting. You would merely remove the extension part, and reattach the standard '03 floorplate to the rifle.
 

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I agree, ten is enough.
I have been looking for a 760 to use the 10 round mag in but haven't found an older model I can afford. Would like to have a308 so I can use the 06 mag. If I could find a 06 with a bad barrel I would rebarrel it to 260. That would be a real winner having a 260 pump gun with floating barrel.
 

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Hmmm...
I dunno 'bout pumpin' 'round no 10-shot magazine box. Might get in your way a tad. You may have to hold your weak-side arm out to the side somewhat, which would have a deleterious effect upon your marksmanship. Or just accept the occasional scar inside your elbow and down your arm.
How does one use a pump-gun in low prone? (A serious question.)
 

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Very interesting!

Steve, Brent is still around, he married Finn Aagaard's daughter and quit the stock making business. Buddy of mine had several of his stocks and spoke with Brent frequently.
 

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Al Thompson said:
...Brent is still around, he married Finn Aagaard's daughter and quit the stock making business. Buddy of mine had several of his stocks and spoke with Brent frequently.
Thanks. I'm glad to know that.
I'd been told only that "he wasn't around any more." The person who told me that probably only meant that he was out of the stockmaking business, but the way he'd written it made me think that Mr. Clifton had died.

I got the stock more than 13 years ago (and maybe more than 15), and it sat in my L.A. workshop awaiting finishing.
The action and barrel already had a nice, light, walnut stock that I'd cobbled up in maybe 1980, to which Mr. King had added a combined bipod-mount and fore-end stiffener (for a Colt "clothespin" that I carried separately). The magazine box was like the present one, but merely silver-soldered together, and without an openable floorplate. Finally, that bipod mount broke, which impelled me to buy Mr. Clifton's stock with its built-in bipod.
Funny thing: The original walnut stock brought the entire rifle to about seven pounds, including sights but excluding the Colt bipod. Mr. Clifton's stock started out a little heavier, and then I added an M14 cleaning rod and some sundries to the tubes in its butt. Now the whole outfit weighs a little over nine pounds.
It's now less of a Scout Rifle than it ever was!
 

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Snake, I just rebarreled a No 4 MK1 with some enhanced improvements.
1. I turned down a medium varmint weight barrel to fit the barrel channel.
2. It is a 30 cal barrel 300X308.
3. I have a Elliott 303 Brit reamer I had Dave Manson rework and it now has a 30.06 throat so the available bullets to load in it will be far more. The factory throat is huge and it is long.
Test fired it yesterday and it is shooting about 2" at 100. I think once barrel is broken in it will print closer to 1". First I have to get another front sight. It has a -15 now and I need about a +30 or +45 to make it shoot POA/POI at 100 yards. Now it is shooting about a foot high at 100.

I started out with 40 gr. 4895 and 180 Sierras. Going to drop that load and I think it will shoot even better.

I did not headspace it on the rim but used a new unfired 303 Brit case by Remington as a GO Gage thusly on firing the shoulder is not going to move forward or to the rear but maybe .002" on sizing so I should get a long case life.

I might just get another rear handguard, cut a rectangle section out of it and mount a Weaver 92A scope base on it and have a scoped No 4 Scout rifle that is a good shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What's the weight on it?
 

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I assume you mean just the barrel? I did not weigh it as compared to original but I suspect maybe only a few more ounces. It fits inside the stock and I did not have to cut stock.
 
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