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I just purcahsed a shotgun as noted above. 12 gauge. I would liketo know what accessories are recommended as well as any spare parts and/or tools for repairs. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

IBX2000
 

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Other than cleaning stuff you really don't need any tools and unless you plan on shooting many thousands of rounds you won't need spare parts.

A sling might be handy and people seem to like those sidesaddle ammo carriers
 

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Before you buy any accessories at all, shoot a hundred rounds through the gun. This will give you a better feel for what you might want.

Remember, there's always a cost/benefit to any addition.
The cost is, anything you add will make the gun heavier, bulkier and slower to swing.
You have to do a "real world" analysis to determine if an accessories benefit is worth the loss of speed in action.

What makes the shotgun the world's most effective close range weapon is SPEED. While a pistol or rifle shooter is still getting the sights aligned and on target, the shotgunner has already eliminated the problem and moved on. This is because the shotgun is instinctively "pointed" at close range instead of carefully aimed.
It's the speed at which you can swing the gun and get it on target so fast that makes it so effective.
In this case, Speed kills....the bad guy.

Anything you install will make the gun heavier, bulkier, and more complicated, so you have to decide if your situation warrants adding an accessory.
You see guns with so much junk hanging off them, it takes a body builder to lift it and it's so slow to get on target you'll be dead before you can fire.
These aren't real defense guns, these are just range toys.
Look at a real pro's gun and it'll be very simple with few accessories.

Do a serious and above all else HONEST evaluation of your situation before installing anything.
If you're likely encounter is probably going to be with one or two intruders, the four rounds in the standard magazine are almost certainly enough.
If you live across the street from a biker bar and they like to kick in doors, you might need a magazine extension and even a side saddle.
The benefit is more ammo, the cost is a slower gun and the side saddle may block your vision to the left.

As for spare parts, the 870 Police is about as bullet proof as a gun can get. It's got a 60 year history of standing up to the Night Watch version of "hold my beer and watch this".
I once knew a big city department armorer who joked that his 870 spare parts supply would fit into a shoe box with room left over for a burger and fries.
Most of his repairs were knocked off sights, bent or crushed barrels, splintered wood, and rust.

However, you could keep an extra extractor, spring and plunger, and a firing pin and spring.
If the factory magazine follower bothers you, replace it with something like the Wilson bright green follower, or the orange Choate.
If you keep it loaded all the time, a spare Police model heavy-duty factory spring might be good.
If you do keep it loaded, note that the big danger is not spring problems, it's compressed and bulged shells.
Over time some shells will bulge between the shell head and the shot column so inspect at least monthly. If the shells start compressing and bulging, shoot them up, since once they start they keep on even if you "rest" them.
Use premium grade American shells, since these tend to be stronger, better plastic.

For tools, get a wood or plastic golf tee to use to push the receiver pins out, and good cleaning gear, including a chamber brush and handle to scrub the chamber.
The trigger group doesn't need to be disassembled nor does the bolt so you don't need more than a 1/16" and 1/8" punch just in case you do.
The shell releases are staked in place and aren't to be removed at all so you don't need a special release staking tool.

A broken ejector or spring is a factory-only replacement item. These seldom break.

Best advice is to shoot the gun a lot before installing anything, and think hard about what benefit any accessory is really going to be.
Decide up front if this is a real defense gun or just a range toy.
If it's a toy, have at it and install everything you want including the dot sight AND the laser, and the side saddle and extension and the butt cuff and the bayonet lock.
If it's a real defense gun be stingy about what you hang on it unless there's a genuine need.
 

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Charlie and DFaris have both given you excellent advice.

Couple years ago I picked up a 1952 870 Wingmaster with 20" barrel for a very reasonable price. Only change I've made to it is to add an 8-round mag extension. Simple is good.

I'm against sights on shotguns (especially the so-called "ghost rings" and optics, unless you're planning on using the thing as an ersatz 100-yard deer "rifle"), but I wouldn't mind replacing the simple brass bead with a Tritium "night" one. I put such a bead on a Mossberg 500 Turkey Gun in 1989 and it just finally "died" sometime in the last three years.
 

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I find I have to disagree slightly with Snake on the sights. The factory rifle sights are a good thing, in case you do have to make a precison shot. At close range, quick and dirty, the front sight is all that is necessary. Contrary to myth & legend, you do have to aim a shotgun.

If you go to a sidesaddle, do the 4 shot version, the 6 shot can get in the way of your hand. The first time I tried using an 870 with the 6 shot sidesaddle, I bled all over the guys new gun, upsetting him severely. Do not under any circumstances get one of those slings that double as an ammo carrier!

If the magazine follower is the little plastic cup, replace it with a solid one from Choate or Scattergun Technologies. The ST version has a little plastic bump that keeps crimps intact and acts as a empty magazine indicator if you check the mag with your digits (if you feel the bump, you're empty!).

I happen to like mounted lights on my shotgun. It lets you ID what you're looking at and control the weapon at the same time. You don't have to aim the gun at what you're looking at to use the light, and you shouldn't unless you ID a threat.

Birdshot (they call it that for a reason) is for practice, buckshot & slugs for serious work. Do practice until racking in a new round while the weapon recoils is reflex. Once you've learned the strengths & limitations of your weapon, you can consider possible modifications. Fitting a choke tube may be a good idea depending upon how your weapon performs and your specific situation.

Find a copy of Louis Awerbucks The Defensive Shotgun. His other works are good too. Mas Ayoobs Stressfire II also has a lot of good shotgun stuff.
 

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William R. Moore said:
I find I have to disagree slightly with Snake on the sights. The factory rifle sights are a good thing, in case you do have to make a precison shot.
At LFI-II, I shot a slug group with the tritium-bead sighted M500 Turkey gun at 50 yards that you could cover with your hand (admittedly, much to my surprise). I don't ask more precision of a shotgun than that, but I concede that there might be those who do.

I've observed that people who come to the "combat" shotgun from a background of trap or skeet or lots of bird hunting almost never feel the need to add sights to their social scatterguns, while those who come to the combat shotgun from a background of shooting mostly rifle and/or pistol almost always want to. And I was initially one of the latter--until LFI-II.

Do not under any circumstances get one of those slings that double as an ammo carrier!
Quoted for truth! :thumbsup: They LOOK like a great idea in the Cheaperthandirt or Sportsman's Guide catalog, but put one on, load it up with shells and mount the shotgun fast. You only have to do it once to discover why this belongs in the Bad Idea Hall of Shame. :evil:
 

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Snake, at SG instructor school, I watched a Marine put 10 slugs into a similar group with an issue 870 with nothing on the barrel-all the sights done fell off. While a wonderous demonstration of performing the fundamentals, and probably not something you're going to need to do in the real world, it's likely not something repeatable under stress. You can always ignore sights, you can't wish them on there when you need them.

While I agree with your comment about backgrounds, whacking itty bitty birdies isn't the same thing as other chores. I'm not referring to tweed shooting coats either. I was actually quite impressed with the abillity of our 870Ps with beads at 25 yards with slugs. On the other hand, it was a square range, unobstructed targets and no women & kids or TV idiots running about. Neither were there lawyers lurking in the background nor administrative types draped over our shoulders. I prefer options. [I did LTM, not LFI II.]
 

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As one who grew up hunting quail and then competitive skeet I agree that sights are handicaps to the instinctive shooting a shotgun usually wants

There simply is no substitute for rounds downrange... didn't Charlie Petty once say, "you can't gadget your way to competence."
 

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End of shift got in the way of a complete comment. And touche' Charlie.

I've noticed that the bead appeared to be faster than sights within 25 yards. However, it was never verified with a timer, nor verified to be a significant difference. I also believe it may be related to the relative size of the respective front beads. When I was supplying my own hardware, I settled on a 3/32" brass front bead, which seemed to bridge the size gap satisfactorily. I gave up a bit of utility at 100 yards (not significant in my tactical situation at the time) for speed at closer ranges. The rear sight was a Williams shotgun aperature about 1/4" in diameter. The combo was very fast with sufficient precision to the task.

One of the issues in defensive use of the shotgun is positive target identification. Unless the friendlies are all behind you and the BGs in front. That somewhat mitigates instinctive usage.
 

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Trap shooting -- You don't look at the bead, you look at the bird. You don't aim a shotgun, you point it. So, first it needs to fit. That said, I had a pistol grip on a 870 Wingmaster, 20" bbl. I took a grab shot at a can from < 10 paces, and MISSED! I put the shoulder stock back on it, and can shoot trap with it.
 

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The only change from dfariswheel's recommendation is not to go with the Choate follower, I've had too many clients that had them jamb in the mag tube, but to go with the Wilson (Scattergun Tech) or the Vang Comp.
 

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Excellent advice. Only small thing I can add is to use birdshot for at least your first rounds downrange. Slugs and buckshot tend to kick pretty hard and you need to get your "manual of arms" down first - getting thumped can come later.

Do not be surprised if some particular brand of wally world cheap birdshot chokes your 870. The problem is the ammo, not the 870.

I too find that a rear sight helps once you get past 20 yards or so, especially if your trying to hit something with a slug. Years ago when I hunted Ft. Benning (slugs only area), I found consistently hitting a milk jug at 50 yards was no issue for my bead sighted 1100. Imagine my surprise when I missed the first deer. Did some analysis and found that if I didn't maintain a good tight cheek weld, I'd miss. For 30 bucks, I got a set of clamp on sights that solved the problem. FWIW, my home defense 870 has a SureFire forend and a bead. My hunting 870 has rifle sights.
 

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FWIW, I've sufficiently recovered from the Tactical Police Competition to make some scattergun related comments. I fired a shotgun from positions I've never used before and devoutly hope never to again.

1. Saw many semis choke. From the vast variety of empty shells observed, there were a whole bunch of folks "gaming" with loads as light as 7/8 oz/24 gram. Combined with an unusual shooting position, the gun may not have had sufficient stability to operate, even if it does so under square range conditions.
1A. The unusual shooting positions also impacted the ability of pump gunners to operate the guns at times.

2. Get some dummies and practice malfunction drills.

3. Practice reloading. While it many never be necessary in self/home defense, on the job training when lives are at risk is not an optimum process. Same goes for some less traditional shooting positions.

BTW, some of those shooting positions played hob with cheek weld/pattern placement for those with bead sights.
 

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Here's what I've got on my 870 clone you can do the same if you so choose.

Nordic components +1 extension
GG&G follower
Stock magazine tube spring
Magpul moe forend cerakoted magpul od green.
Magpul miad grip in od green with grip tape.
Magpul moe stock with cds tactical neoprene cheek rest with limb saver butt pad with IWC moe stock sling adapter.
Mesa tactical 870 leo adapter
Kynshot hydraulic adjustable recoil buffer
Magpul forward sling mount
Timney sear with 3 pound spring
Remington 870 police dog carrier spring. (You won't need this your gun already has it).
Tacstar metal plate with industrial strength velcro cut to shape and an skd tactical 7 shot shot card.
Wilson combat jumbo safety
Cerakoted patriot brown over manganese park.
800 lumen inforce wmlx light
Vickers vcas padded sling

You can get +2 with the Nordic +1 extension ggg follower and the stock magazine spring.

870 clone on the bottom

Mine has ghost ring sights. That's what I like on my shotguns!



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