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http://finance.yahoo.com/news/massive-fix-countrys-most-popular-211600967.html

<http://finance.yahoo.com/news/massive-fix-countrys-most-popular-211600967.html>

The article includes details on the settlement, the fix, and the history of the safety concern in question going back to the late 1940s.

It also gives insight into the mindset of the company that owns Remington that may be of interest regarding other Remington firearm issues.
 

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My Understanding...

...is that the overwhelming majority of the shootings that resulted in litigation were the result of pressing the trigger with the safety engaged, then having the rifle fire when the safety was moved to the firing position, with the muzzle pointed in an unsafe direction.

I own a Model 700 precision rifle, which I haven't fired in many years. I never experienced this problem but, in the manner in which I used it, I rarely engaged the safety. (I never chambered a round before I was prepared to fire and, if a line break was called with a round chambered, I emptied the chamber.)

It may not be the wisest choice for others but I'm not willing to risk what I consider a perfect trigger on this sort of gun (~four pounds, with absolutely no creep) by sending it in for the "upgrade."
 

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I am reminded of the Audi 5000 fiasco, wherein the media glommed onto stories of "sudden acceleration", and accomplished a near-perfect assassination of the car's, and by extension, the company's, reputation.

It later turned out, of course, that there was nothing wrong with the car, and that the hapless drivers had inadvertently floored the accelerator rather than the brake.

The man-machine interface is my bread and butter, and I see almost daily the folly of many "safety" systems, which are meant to help end up exacerbating a situation. God save us when the engineers try to protect us, and themselves, from the ambulance chasers.
 

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This has been going on forever. Back in the 90s I was hunting in Texas and scope a nice deer that I was thinking of taking. Did not but "counted coup" by pressing the trigger with the safety on. Some time later I saw a shootable buck. When I flipped the safety off the gun did not fire until I touched the trigger. Literally just touched it and it fired. One ounce... maybe.

The good news was that I hit the deer precisely where I was holding and he dropped like a rock.

Then I sent it back to Remington.
 

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I am reminded of the Audi 5000 fiasco...

It later turned out, of course, that there was nothing wrong with the car, and that the hapless drivers had inadvertently floored the accelerator rather than the brake.
Every one of the cars that experienced sudden acceleration had automatic transmissions. Most likely the idiot drivers had one foot on the brake and one on the gas and spazed.
 

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This rather falls into the category I once heard explained by the Mechanical Engineering prof. It's not too hard to make something foolproof. It's almost impossible to make something damn fool proof.

I have to wonder exactly how many bolt gun owners actually ever pull the action from the stock and attempt any kind of regular preventive maintenance. Futzing with the trigger to "improve it" doesn't count.
 

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This rather falls into the category I once heard explained by the Mechanical Engineering prof. It's not too hard to make something foolproof. It's almost impossible to make something damn fool proof.

I have to wonder exactly how many bolt gun owners actually ever pull the action from the stock and attempt any kind of regular preventive maintenance. Futzing with the trigger to "improve it" doesn't count.
Good point. A lesson I learned as a (much) younger man is that Clint was right..."A man's got to know his limitations."

I thought since I had figured out how to detail strip and re-assemble a 1911, I could maybe "polish the sear" and get one of them real nice trigger pulls I read about in the gun magazines.

Test firing the newly converted two to three shot burst pistol (yeah, I was stupid enough to pull the trigger twice) proved I was wrong. :oops::oops::bolt:
 

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BTW, Remington may not be entirely blameless on this, but the incident rate is really miniscule. I adjusted the trigger on a 700 VLS in .308 I bought some years back and decided to do it per the detailed instructions I had been provided-which included adjustment of the sear engagement-something I'd never before attempted. The as found trigger was quite crisp but heavy. Quite simply, I had more sear engagement than the factory provided when I was done.
 
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