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Discussion Starter #1
I was digging through the latest available version of the NYPD Firearms Discharge Report looking for useful information. Took me awhile to realize this one:

Roughly 75% of the unintentional discharges happened during what we'd refer to as routine handling. The majority involved loading/unloading. Yeah, there were two "during cleaning".

Roughly 45% of the UDs involved personal injuries, with the victim generally being the (mis)handler.

Now the numbers weren't great given the number of officers involved, but there's a obvious lack of paying attention to what they were doing and failure to follow the basic safety precautions. There's a lesson here folks: do not neglect the basics and pay attention to what you're doing. If you're an instructor, emphasize this and don't ignore transgressions.
 

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Were firearm make/model included in the stats?
 

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Roughly 75% of the unintentional discharges happened during what we'd refer to as routine handling. The majority involved loading/unloading. Yeah, there were two "during cleaning".
Is why I now longer participate in the shooting games. Administrative gun handling increases the risks every time the gun is handled, and people get complacent over what is and is not a loaded gun. IF its loaded all the time, like Col Cooper said, then you act like its loaded and you dont have people blowing toes off unholstering and holstering weapons over the course of competition.

I firmly believe that Cleaning errors are coverups, to give family peace of mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Snake45 said:
Were firearm make/model included in the stats?
No. Are we on the edge of a snarky comment? I expect I'm mentally plugging in the same make, given the percentage of the force armed with them and their history. However, given the various NY triggers :cluebat: , causing a (to use the term in the report) "accidental discharge" with an 8 lb or better trigger does require effort, if not thought.

Since there were no fatalities, the families can get whatever piece of mind they desire from the source. I expect that such "cleaning errors" are why the S&W M&P has a sear release lever that requires the slide be locked open to access.
 

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Charlie Petty said:
S&W M&P has a sear release lever that requires the slide be locked open to access.
That would be TOTALLY correct... and you don't have to pull the bloody trigger either :!:
However, it may be worth noting that the sear can still be released the old-fashioned way for disassembly - by pressing the trigger - a fact that is pointed out in the armorer course, in the even that one cannot reach the sear-release lever.
 
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