Gun Hub Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
I have a few friends that have quit carrying due to discussions about this and after having "The Dream"

If you pull it be prepared to use it and if you don't think you can use it then leave it at home so no one can take it from you and use it against you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,804 Posts
Once upon a time, I worked for a guy who had spent a lot of time in places most people would not want to. I worked on his house and when he found I had acarry permit he talked about what he had carried


In a while he decided to show me one of his pistols. It was an older beretta .380 and in the case were several barrels. The reasoning was obvious
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,432 Posts
"A revolver with the barrel removed could easily deliver a lethal bullet at close range".

And has.
There was a famous gunman in Texas. I "think" his name was Bass Outlaw. Strangely with that name, he was a Texas Ranger who went bad.
He had a Colt SAA with no barrel and no trigger. The trigger guard was cut off similar to the famous "Fitz" Colt's of the 1930's leaving a trigger-like projection.
He used the cut off trigger guard as an aid to hold the gun which he fired by "slipping" the hammer.
To do this, you pull the hammer back and let it slip loose from the thumb.
Outlaw used this modified Colt as a close range hip pocket gun.

It's shocking the number of policemen you find who when it comes time to shoot, just can't and freeze up or try to handle it another way.
This is something no one knows until the critical moment.
in the military, the training is designed to prepare a soldier to fire his weapon when it comes time to do so, and the number of soldiers who DO is very high.

A classic case of someone not prepared was in the Olympic takeover of the Israeli athletes in Germany.
They had too few snipers to handle the situation, and when it came time to shoot, one key sniper just.....didn't.
They knew he COULD shoot, he'd proved that thousands of times on the range, but when he was looking through a scope at a human, he just was unable to pull the trigger.
Carlos Hathcock spoke of this. He said that when you looked through a sniper scope at a human, you saw eyes. Some men just couldn't pull the trigger.

I have a relative who has over 30 years in law enforcement. He's told me about some policemen who come to realize they can't do this, and transfer into an assignment that won't have the issue come up, or failing that, quite.
He knew a local man who did three years on the force, then left to become a fireman after an incident in which he should have fired, and didn't. He understood that this wasn't fair to other cops who'd depend on him to do what was needed.
This is not a matter of being a coward, it's just that some people can't do this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
Instructors told us that if the Marine(s) on either side of you weren't shooting they were either
dead or badly wounded.

Problem I have with watching all the shoot outs on TV (cops,etc.) is all that range
training with the glasses and earmuffs just goes down the drain and
the overall result is the old "point-and-pull". I have seen only a couple out of many
who actually aimed and hit the bad guy.

Training change? I think it would be very helpful, especially to the guys
in the really high crime areas.

Of course it happens to the best of us. My buddy told me that while in Korea
he fired a full clip out of his M1 at a **** running up a hill not far away from
him, and to the best of his knowledge, he never touched him...... :lol:
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top