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Discussion Starter #1
So am I the only one who just wonders what exactly that two piece trigger accomplishes? At least with a Glock you have to push the center of the trigger to get the pistol to discharge. That way if there is something in the way during holstering it would have to protrude all the way through the trigger guard in order to set the pistol off. With the Sigma/M&P design, all you have to do is catch the side of the trigger. To me, this make the two piece design superfluous and more marketing than anything useful. How long until people wise up and replace the two piece trigger with a one piece. I mean, I look at that trigger and what immediately comes to mind is…”That thing is going to break at some point”.

Now with all that said, I haven’t heard about any AD/ND’s that were attributed to the trigger design, but it just doesn’t make any sense to me. Honestly, 20 years ago when the Sigma came out (or whenever they came out), that was my first observation about the gun.
 

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Kevin Gibson,

FYI, I regard both the S&W & G***k as "unreasonably dangerous" & wouldn't own either one.

yours, sw
 

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Dean and I were both in Florida for S&W's announcement of the Sigma. That was also when Kris Killoy and I introduced Dean to the Prodigy shooting sports BB now better known as gun hub.

The trigger was about the only thing different with the Sigma and some wondered aloud about the similarly to Glock... some said Glock would sue... and we all know how that turned out.

I tested the Sigma and could not make it fire if the lower segment of the trigger wasn't pressed but also wonder about the practical value
 

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Has anyone actual weighted the triggers in a comparison test:

Glock which felt lighter than my Kahr 9094, but varied from model to model 17, 23, 26 in my experience.
Glock NY trigger
S&W Sigma 9VE which felt more like a DA SP101 .22 RF revolver
S&W 9 SD which is lighter than a Sigma to my touch
S&W M&P which I am told is lighter than mine
S&W Shield felt very light to me and I was happy to see the manual safety.
Walther PPQ supposedly the lightest

Or any of the vast assembly of hi-cap revolver substitutes.
Geoff
Who is curious enough to do some of them, well two anyway.
 

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My understanding is that the gadgety triggers are essentially 'striker locks' to ensure the gun cannot fire unless the trigger is pressed.
 

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Actually, the striker is locked by the safety block or plunger. There's an itty-bitty tab on the rear of the lower half of the hinged trigger that won't let the trigger travel unless the lower half of the trigger pivots. Does the same thing as the G***** thingy in a different way.

Frankly, I think the long, revolver like pull makes the hinged trigger unnecessary, but I'm not a lawyer-or bidding for large contracts that may make the device mandatory.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Actually, the striker is locked by the safety block or plunger. There's an itty-bitty tab on the rear of the lower half of the hinged trigger that won't let the trigger travel unless the lower half of the trigger pivots. Does the same thing as the G***** thingy in a different way.

Frankly, I think the long, revolver like pull makes the hinged trigger unnecessary, but I'm not a lawyer-or bidding for large contracts that may make the device mandatory.
That and the fact that if the trigger is contacted by anything, it's likely to be the lower half. I just see the hinged trigger as a complete non-safety device.
 
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