Gunhub.com banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If "Three is two and two is one" as I've seen quoted elsewhere, then maybe the best way to inventory spare gun parts is simply to have duplicates of your "designated SHTF" guns, plus spares of the parts that tend to wear out over time (springs, pins, firing pins, extractors and the individual 'most prone to failure' parts unique to any weapon).

Opinions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,494 Posts
Absolutly.
I would also add that it might be a good idea to "know" the rifle...that is, know if it has any particular part that is unusually prone to problems or breakage or even wear. This may not be obvious. If you find it does, stock up on these parts too.
{and always have a second gun}.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
TommyGunn said:
Absolutly.
I would also add that it might be a good idea to "know" the rifle...that is, know if it has any particular part that is unusually prone to problems or breakage or even wear. This may not be obvious. If you find it does, stock up on these parts too.
{and always have a second gun}.
Any opinion on "bolt buffers"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,494 Posts
To be frank I really don't know enough about bolt buffers to have an opinion. It seems to me that they may be more useful in some types of guns than in others though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,362 Posts
wombat said:
the best way to inventory spare gun parts is simply to have duplicates of your "designated SHTF" guns
YUP!!
rickb308 said:
Any opinion on "bolt buffers"?
At one point, out at Gunsite, my 1911 started ejecting empties into my forehead. As time went on, it got worse and worse. I gave up and ran over to the 'Smithy, to have them make a go at it.

Just a SHORT time later, the pistol was ready again. It was explained to me that the extractor had just "gotten soft" and needed retensioning.

Then he pulls out my Wilson (back when I actually half-way cared for Wilson) shock-buffer with a pair of long tweezers, like it was a dead rat. In a good "parent with the book kept under the mattress" voice, he asked "WHAT'S THIS?".

It was explained to me that shok buffs are NOT to be employed, trusted, or tolerated. So I haven't run one since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
TommyGunn said:
It seems to me that they may be more useful in some types of guns than in others though.
Yeah, didn't figure the Ruger 10/22 really
needed one. :D
(Have seen them for sale)

Was curious about the bigger calibers is all.

Thanks all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,290 Posts
Bolt Buffers were originally designed to be a back stop in target weapons. The idea was to back up the recoil spring if and when it was too soft for the ammo used, preventing frame battering. The battering not only damaged the weapon, but could cause a loss of accuracy.

Since then, enterprising types have "discovered" the "benefit" of Bolt Buffers in virtually every semi-auto known to man, under all circumstances.

It may help eke out the last little bit of accuracy in a target weapon. With a life expectancy of 500 rounds, or so, it's just another piece to fail in other grade/use weapons. A proper recoil spring will have the same effect in a more utilitarian weapon. :D

That said, over the years several manufacturers have incorporated various kinds of buffers in some weapons. I believe the Rem. 1100 was one. Factory buffers are a different breed entirely. :D
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top