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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has everyone heard about the newest Glock model? It is called the Glock 37 and is in a new caliber, the 45 Glock. The new 45 Glock is actually a short cased .45 round.

At this time, Speer is the only company to offer a defense round for the .45 Glock. The .45 Glock Gold Dot is offered in two different weights, 185 and 200 grains. It is reported that the 185 gr Gold Dot is moving at 1100 FPS and producing about 197 FT/LB of energy.

Here is a couple of pics of the new Glock.









 

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Since you brought it up...

I have heard some of the reasons for the existence of the 45 Glock. One is the ability to put a .45 caliber cartridge in a frame the size of the Glock 17. Okay, I guess if you are a serious Glock enthusiast that may matter to you. I will admit that the Glock 21 and 30 are a bit on the chubby side when it comes to the grip. What about the 36, you ask? Well, the complaint I've heard is the grip may be slim but it is also too long, making it uncomfortable to shoot. A Glock shooting a .45 caliber bullet with the same frame dimensions as that of their 9mm sounds like a great concept. If it had been executed with the .45 ACP cartridge. The 45 Glock? I think it is a big mistake.

For years Hirtenberger has been loading the .45 Automatic Short. It's based on the .45 ACP case shortened by one millimeter. Their advertised muzzle velocity for a 230 grain FMJ is 835 fps. What was the purpose of this stubby .45 ACP derivative? For the countries that did not allow civilians to own .45 ACP chambered autoloaders (France, Italy, Mexico, & others) this was the answer to the problem.

Now we have Gaston Glock and his very successful autoloader design. He made his success on the original model 17 and 19, then added many more. But take a look at the rollmark on the barrel hood of some of his models. The .40 S&W is not rollmarked .40 S&W, but instead .40. The same is true with the 357 SIG and even the old .45 ACP. While that may be a means to simplify their markings it can also be looked at as a man with his name on his gun not wanting anyone else to have their name next to his. Rumor has it that Cor-Bon had approached Glock some years ago about chambering a model 21 for their yet-to-be-released .400 Cor-Bon. For whatever reason that went sour and Cor-Bon went on to release the cartridge alone. Later when Triton introduced the .40 Super cartridge to the market it too was passed by the people at Glock. They tested a model 21 and 30 with Bar-Sto barrels chambered for this hot cartridge. They were supplied with ammo, barrel reamers, pressure data, etc. During the discussions one thing was brought up repeatedly. If Mr. Glock were to approve of this cartridge and come out with a new gun, he would want to name it the .40 or .400 Glock. Well, I guess that would have been acceptable. Why not, the attention the cartridge would get and the potential of every other ammo maker latching on to it was great. Unfortunately, like many other projects, this one did not see the light of day. It did, however, show a pattern of things to come.

Now, a few years later we have the introduction of the 45 Glock cartridge. It definitely serves the purpose of having a cartridge with Mr. Glock's name on it but does it bring anything to the table for the end user that is new? Lets look at the ballistics. Glock did the right thing by turning to ATK for their cartridge development. By making that one stop they get the talent of Alan Corzine (one of the top bullet designers in the world) coupled with two ammo companies, Federal and Speer. So initially it's Speer that gets a crack at this "new" design.

We all know the cartridge case is shorter than the .45 ACP. How does it compare structurally to the old .45 ACP? The pressure limit for the .45 ACP is considered ancient by many at 19,000 PSI. Even +P loads at 23,000 PSI seem tame compared to 35,000 PSI for the .40 S&W. There have been improvements over the years in brass construction with the .45 ACP. The web area has been thickened and the brass itself stronger, making the .45 ACP case able to hold up to greater pressures. The 450 SMC and .45 Super cartridges are just beefed up .45 ACP cases for that matter. Now if Glock is going to prevent another long chain of gun failures their new case must be made stronger than conventional .45 ACP brass. Without sectioning a case that remains to be seen if it in fact has been done. We do know, however, that the only loadings that will be available will come in the 185-200 grain weight. That tells me that they cannot use a 230 grain because of case capacity issues. The important thing here is they have been able to match but not surpass the ballistics of .45 ACP+P.

Now the question remains, why a 45 Glock? It does serve the purpose of making a smaller Glock able to toss a .45 caliber bullet. Then again, years ago the same was being done with the Detonics Combat Master with .45 ACP and even .451 Detonics Magnum. Will the other major players (SIG, S&W, HK, Taurus, Beretta, Colt & all their knock-offs) step up and offer an autoloader in this cartridge? That is where I would need the crystal ball. The same holds true for the other ammo makers.

In recent years we saw the same thing happen with the release of two competitive cartridges, the .356 TSW and the 357 SIG. Both were able to deliver a 9mm bullet at velocities greater than any 9mm+P+ load on the market. The TSW had the edge with magazine capacity but for reasons left up to debate, the 357 SIG took hold and the TSW fell into the history books next to other cartridges like the .41 AE.

Personally, I will stick to anything chambered in .45 ACP and watch the 45 Glock debate from a distance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Re: Since you brought it up...

Fernando Coelho said:
Personally, I will stick to anything chambered in .45 ACP and watch the 45 Glock debate from a distance.
I'm with you on that. Personally, I am going to keep my Glock 23 and 36 for concealed carry and sit the .45 Glock thing out. What will make or break the cartridge is if other gun makers start to chamber their pistols in the .45 Glock.

If things go well with the Glock 37, Gaston will more than likely make a compact and subcompact version of the Glock 37. IMHO, I don't see much of an advantage of a Glock 37 over a Glock 22. There is a lot of bullet makers out there that are making some nice carry ammo for the .40 S&W that work well and do the job. I guess only time will tell.
 
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Jeff Cooper once asked Bill Ruger what a certain new gun was for. The Colonel didn't see where the gun solved any problem or filled any particular niche. Mr. Ruger said the gun was to SELL.

Glock has come out with the Model 37 to sell. He will come out with compact and other models of it. In a year or two he will come out with something totally different.

If the 37 takes off and becomes something big, that will be great. If all he does is sell several tens of thousands of the guns and then the fad wears off, nothing lost.

I am not a fan of Glock pistols. They are very well made and work almost without fail. They are too fat for my tastes. I look at pistols as something to put inside my waistband and they take up too much room.

Alvin
 

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Glock 37

Well I guess I am a Glock Fan, of sorts. I carried a "17" for my last 10 years of service. I was one of the FAI's that converted our Dept. to the Glocks. A good weapon that takes a lot of abuse. I now carry either a "23" or "27". I really never saw any value in a 9mm. When I bought my Glocks the :?: 36 had not been introduced yet. But a new calibre????? I really wonder if it will catch on.
 

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Re: Glock 37

retiredsgt said:
But a new calibre????? I really wonder if it will catch on.
Only time will tell. Traditionally, new calibers take years to catch on unless adopted by the military. However, recall the meteoric rise of the .40 S&W cartridge. It only took about 2 years from its introduction to become almost a standard for numerous LEAs.

With so many Glockophiles out there, I'd bet that the new cartridge will enjoy at least moderate success....but I'm not betting on it.
 
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Two Guns that Glock could have come out with if he'd have had his head out of his arse would have been...

1 - A single stack 9mm (what with the magizine limit and the cost of pre-ban normal capacity Glock mags).

2 - A .22 (think along the lines of the Walther P22)

Either of those would probably have been a better bet for sales purposes.
 

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AHammer said:
Glock has come out with the Model 37 to sell.
Totally agreed. These new wonder caliber-gun combos wont do anything my old Colt pre-series 70 .45 acp wont do.
 

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Re: Glock 45?

AHammer said:
The 45 Glock is not a 45 caliber. It is 43.
AH HA! I knew there was something screwy! Making a cartridge shorter won't allow it to be put in a narrower-framed gun. Do lyou know the actual bullet diameter?
 
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Gaston is not gonna like you!
Fernando, he will love me for starting this, probably even send me a commission or something.

You know that in his mind this is exactly what he was thinking when he conceaved the 37 & .45 AGP cartridge.
 

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Schmit ---


Me thinks if John Browning were alive ---- he would personally hunt you down and KICK YOUR A$$ :twisted:

Do you realize what an insult that is to him????? :?: Heck --- I would not be surprised if his descendants are not already putting a contract out on you with the "boys from brownsville" :lol:

Mike
 
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Mike,

When the hit man comith I will plead for my life and show my 1911 that I carry and Cindy's Hi-Power, I'll then open my safe as evidence that I do NO worship at the Tennifer Temple. :oops:
 
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