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Discussion Starter #1
I've always been kind of put off by the way we bury our dead, particularly the idea of buying a massive steel or polished wood box, only drop it into a hole in the ground, most often in a massive concrete vault. I like the idea behind the unpretentious wood boxes made by various craftsmen, such as the monks of Saint Joseph Abbey in Louisiana:

Saint Joseph Abbey - Woodworks - Caskets

But at $1500 to $2000, even those seem a little extravagant. Thus, I've always had the idea in the back of my head that I might just like to make my own.

Stay with me now...

Recently, I've decided that one of my next projects would be to try and replicate the standard wooden munitions crates the US military uses. Even though the dimensions vary depending on the armament, the design remains remarkably consistent, something along these lines:



or this:



As I searched the internet for examples, I kept finding pictures that reminded me of something, but I couldn't quite put my finger on it. Finally, it hit me: what does this look like to you?



Or this?



Gentlemen, I give you The Shooter's Casket.

The possibilities are endless. For example, this guy essentially created a "casket" for his AR-15, but you can see the potential:





I'd kind of like to keep it simple, but I do like the idea of the traditional stenciling on the outside of the box:



I think mine would say something like:

1 EA, GYRO, CAPT, INERT

Well, gentlemen and ladies, there you have it. Anybody ready to order?
 

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And in most places, even if you choose to be cremated, you must purchase a casket anyway.
 

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CaptainGyro; SpecialEd; All GIs,

FWIW, IF you are an honorably discharged/separated veteran, an active/reserve/NG servicemember and you are being interred/inurned in Arlington National Cemetery (as I will be), in another National Cemetery or in a VA Cemetery and are to be CREMATED, your survivors need NOT pay for a casket/coffin.
(The out of pocket costs for any of those VETs inurnment/interment is "peanuts", when compared to what "those who never served" family WILL pay.)

When "Uncle Ed" (a LTC, USA) passed away & was inurned at ANC, his daughter (Wendy) wrote a check to Arlington County, VA for the sum of 55.oo to transport his remains to Ft Lee's Graves Registration Office. - That 55 bucks was the TOTAL "out of pocket" cost to his family.
(IF you are a VET/GI, do NOT pay for burial insurance, as such a policy for "persons to be cremated" is a WASTE of $$$$$$$$$.)

yours, sw
 

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And in most places, even if you choose to be cremated, you must purchase a casket anyway.
Some years ago colleague of mine was quite vocal about what he called "The funeral racket" after his step father died. The number of regulations and laws concerning burial forced him to go through a funeral home and they were quite insistent on selling him embalming, a viewing room, flowers, a fancy casket etc. He held firm on no embalming, the cheapest casket they offered, no viewing, no funeral, just a short burial service. They finally got it when he described in what an unpleasant violent thug the man had been in life and how the world was a nicer place without him. He was going to have a marker made that said "Good Riddance - You will not be missed" but the funeral home refused to order it.
 

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Saran wrap...about $10 for three rolls..
 

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I knew a guy that was cremated, loaded into shotgun shells, and fired over his range by a bunch of his friends.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cardboard, saran wrap, government-provided boxes...you guys are missing the point that Dr. Tim's aquaintance obviously understood: STYLE.

Go out with some panache.
 

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One of my friend's parents were interred in the front yard of his family home about 2 years apart.

The house is in the middle of a hundred acres of woods in Amherst County, VA.

Mom's remains were in a coffee can, Dad's were in a sea bag.

Jerry Falwell conducted the funerals.
 

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One of my friend's parents were interred in the front yard of his family home about 2 years apart.

The house is in the middle of a hundred acres of woods in Amherst County, VA.

Mom's remains were in a coffee can, Dad's were in a sea bag.

Jerry Falwell conducted the funeral.
Now that's style'n!;)
 

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Captain Gyro & All,

Speaking of style ( true story time):

A rich TEXICAN from Houston, some years ago, insisted on being buried sitting at the wheel of his 1976 Caddy convertible. So the funeral director had a huge hole dug & at the burial, a crane lowered the fellow & convertible into the hole.

A bystander said, "WOW,man. Now, ain't that LIVING."

yours, sw
 

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That reminds me of the sick story of socialite Sandra West being buried in her Ferrari 330 America (One of only fifty made). I doubt anyone would remember or care about her now if not for that Ferrari.
 

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That reminds me of the sick story of socialite Sandra West being buried in her Ferrari 330 America (One of only fifty made). I doubt anyone would remember or care about her now if not for that Ferrari.
I guess that's why you don't see any u-hauls in funeral processions...What a waste of fine Italian craftsmanship. :mrgreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Speaking of U-Hauls...

My grandmother had six grandsons. When she passed away in 1995, we were all pressed into service as the pall bearers. It also happened that she had a '69 Plymouth Fury, in lime green, with only about 60,000 miles on it. It was pretty much identical to this one:



For twenty-five years it had only been to the hair salon, the Piggly-Wiggly, the Golden Corral, and church, all within about a four mile radius. We pallbearers were offered a Cadillac limo for the processions to the church and cemetery, but we unanimously elected to use the Fury.

Well, it was February in Iowa, and the morning of the funeral it was minus 29 degrees (not windchill, absolute temperature). I remember thinking, "Gee, if it was fifty degrees warmer, it would still be freezing." The vinyl seats were like concrete benches when we all piled in, but the old girl fired right up, and away we went.

The lineup in the funeral procession was black Caddy hearse, black Caddy flower car, lime green fury, and black Caddy mourners' limo. We felt that, with the weather the way it was, a bottle of vodka was only a prudent fortification against the cold, so we brought one along for safety's sake.

At the reception afterwards, everyone complimented us on our choice of rides. Later, when we took it to the airport to turn in some rental cars, the Hertz manager bought it on the spot.
 

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Speaking of U-Hauls...

My grandmother had six grandsons. When she passed away in 1995, we were all pressed into service as the pall bearers. It also happened that she had a '69 Plymouth Fury, in lime green, with only about 60,000 miles on it. It was pretty much identical to this one:



For twenty-five years it had only been to the hair salon, the Piggly-Wiggly, the Golden Corral, and church, all within about a four mile radius. We pallbearers were offered a Cadillac limo for the processions to the church and cemetery, but we unanimously elected to use the Fury.
Well, it was February in Iowa, and the morning of the funeral it was minus 29 degrees (not windchill, absolute temperature). I remember thinking, "Gee, if it was fifty degrees warmer, it would still be freezing." The vinyl seats were like concrete benches when we all piled in, but the old girl fired right up, and away we went.

The lineup in the funeral procession was black Caddy hearse, black Caddy flower car, lime green fury, and black Caddy mourners' limo. We felt that, with the weather the way it was, a bottle of vodka was only a prudent fortification against the cold, so we brought one along for safety's sake.

At the reception afterwards, everyone complimented us on our choice of rides. Later, when we took it to the airport to turn in some rental cars, the Hertz manager bought it on the spot.
That's so kewl! piggly-wiggly markets...my dad worked at one in the 40's. My grandparents, refugees from the dust-bowl, always had a Plymouth Fury in their drive way...the last one they bought new was 1970...Fury III..root beer brown. Us kids could camp out in the back seat...:D
 

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CaptainGyro,

I understand about the "snakebite medicine" in the Fury. - You can never tell when you might meet up with an ICE SNAKE.
(ICE SNAKES are really dangerous. = The might sneak up behind you and freeze you plum to death.)

A little PREVENTATIVE treatment ahead of a possible meeting is a good thing.

yours, sw
 

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The Plymouth Fury was the standard "cop" car around these parts for a long, long time. When I got my drivers license the family car was a Dodge Polara with a 400 under the hood. It was a beast in every way.
 
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