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Interesting old video but nasty, boring music score.
I am surprised that there was as many automated mechanical processes back then.
As far as identification; it looks to me like old 1930s vintage Chrysler vehicles being made ... but don't quote me as I am hardly an expert.
 

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Hmmm...
The finished car seems to have an indian-head hood ornament. Pontiac?
Or is it a conquistador, and thus a De Soto?
 

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TommyGunn,

by 1880, Studebaker was building wagons on an assembly line. Springfield Arsenal was assembling weapons on a line too by the 1850s. - it's nearly hard to believe what they could do with steam power & w/o "modern conviences" in the 19th century.

yours, sw
 

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TommyGunn,

by 1880, Studebaker was building wagons on an assembly line. Springfield Arsenal was assembling weapons on a line too by the 1850s. - it's nearly hard to believe what they could do with steam power & w/o "modern conviences" in the 19th century.

yours, sw
Yeah, I know, but actually seeing it is different. I've seen pictures of 19th century assembly equipment powered by overhead pulleys which were in turn powered by a waterfalls turning a paddlewheel.

Some of that equipment in the video link looked a bit more "modern" -- atleast to me -- than I would have thought for the time.
 

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TommyGunn,

btw, at the American History Museum of the Smithsonian, there is a number of pieces of equipment from a 1890s mill that look like they were made yesterday - they are NOT restored but rather just very well maintained.

the machines were powered by a 200HP double-action compound steam engine.

yours, sw
 

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When in London England circa 1992 I visited a science museum there which had a lot of old engines and stuff from the late 19th century and early 20th century. Some looked like real monsters to work on. A lot of car engines from the early automotive era; way big in size but lacking in horsepower -- from our modern perspective that is. Somewhere I recall seeing a european car that was actually powered by a wood-burning stove, though I forget exactly how that worked. It was a pretty clunky loking contraption.
 

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American auto assembly lines in the 1930s were as modern as the world had to offer. That's one reason why we could make so much war materiel so quickly.

What gave me the willies were; no safety glasses, no hearing protection, and no safety barriers on the machines. One wrong step, and you're incorporated in the next model down the line.
 

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American auto assembly lines in the 1930s were as modern as the world had to offer. That's one reason why we could make so much war materiel so quickly.

What gave me the willies were; no safety glasses, no hearing protection, and no safety barriers on the machines. One wrong step, and you're incorporated in the next model down the line.
I used to work in a place making wood stoves. My first duty station was running a press brake with a rough, chain smoking lady who had apparently just gotten out of prison for shooting her husband. After a couple of shifts with her I finally got up the nerve to ask her how she lost the ring and little fingers on her left hand. She indicated a punch press on the other side of the shop:

"If you ain't careful, it'll get ya."

Minutes later I was moved to just that press for training... :D
 

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WaltGraham,

a fellow from Daingerfield. TX was making cedar shingles on a shingle-mill (a number of years ago) & cut a "groove" on the end of his fingers. this was reported to OSHA & a federal inspector came to the mill & asked the fellow to show him exactly how the accident happened, so that he could make a report on how to asure that someone else didn't have the same accident.

"Sure thing", said the worker & "i did it just like this.".

you guessed it: the fellow put "grooves" in the fingers of the other hand!
(the OSHA guy was "NOT impressed".)

yours, sw
 
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