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Discussion Starter #1
The other day I was out practicing Cowboy Action with my Cimarron Model P "Evil Roy".
This included fanning the hammer. I am currently experiencing a problem with the hammer.
The pistol fires. But, upon slowing squeezing the trigger the hammer falls only half way.
Also, I can articulate that hammer back and forth without using the trigger. And mostly, the trigger is so touchy that its lighter then a hair.
This is the 1st malfunction experienced.
Could have a retaining spring become disconnected?
Any idea's are appreciated.
 

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You've definitely got something wrong. :ehsmile:

If you don't get a good answer here by this evening, I'll re-post your question on the Ruger board--lotta very knowledgable SA guys there. :wink:
 

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Fanning is very hard on guns.

Without looking inside I can't say positively but the most likely problems are damage to the cocking notches on the hammer or the sear segment of the trigger. These are not do it yourself problems unless you know SAAs so get a good gunsmith to look at it.
 

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I have a similar pistol; a repro of the Colt SAA. Also, various repros of cap & ball guns which have a very similar mechanism. Mr. Petty's advice sounds right to me. It's difficult to diagnose these things without actually looking inside.
You will probably need to have parts replaced, which entails fitting them, a job done best by someone who knows the guts of this revolver and knows how these parts all interact.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for the advise. Will visit my trusted gunsmith tomorrow. I'll keep you informed on its outcome. And I agree. The fan was something tried after watching it done by another.
Truthfully, it was a wild go of it. I got off 3 uncontrolled shots. They all hit the ground a short ways from where i aimed. However; Clint Eastwood made it look so ez in "A few dollars more" (i think).
Will be sending more info of what actually happened soon.
Thanks again.
 

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Fanning was allegedly invented when a guy was jumped in a privy (ada Outhouse). The technique should stay there.
Per a gunsmith in Cleveland, OH, many years agone.

Geoff
Who only has one single action left...but what do you need besides a Superblackhawk?
 

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The fanning has damaged or broken the sear notch on the hammer. You'll have to replace the hammer at least.
Actors don't use the same prop for every scene. Movie prop guns are modified to be able to do such silly things without breaking 'em.
 

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Fanning a single action will just wreck a gun.
It tears up the hammer and trigger, and batters the hand, cylinder locking bolt, and cylinder ratchets.

The people who do exhibition shooting and include fanning a single action typically have at least three guns: one in use, one in reserve, and one in the shop being rebuilt.

If you care about your gun DON'T FAN IT.
A car version of fanning would be to grab the door and ram it open as hard as you can, then slam it shut with all the force you can. Naturally, the door is going to fail.
So will a single action revolver that's fanned.
 

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eddism said:
Thank you for the advise. Will visit my trusted gunsmith tomorrow. I'll keep you informed on its outcome. And I agree. The fan was something tried after watching it done by another.
From my youth when fanning and fast draw was hot, the fanning guns were not used for anything else. The trigger was reduced to a safety device and the hammer hand cocked and fired the pistol. Rules change, but fanning is a NO-NO unless you have a fanning revolver. The guns were used in blanks vs. balloons competition.

Geoff
Who is afraid somebody has a gunsmith bill they are not gonna like at all.
 

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i ran across one years ago that had been fanned , shall we say more than frequently- what my smith did was to weld enough metal to the hammer to make it back to an original casting, and then recut the notches with a file- seemed like it took him YEARS to do it- it was perfect when he was done, but it was a lot of work- it was one of those clone things and you couldn't get a hammer to fit; you had to make one
 
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