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Charlie, I thought so too, but as I recall there was a lot of debate awhile back re: the above practice. Some claim that's what the manufactuers do. I've thought it was unwise because the powder could be altered, but again others claim...no.
 

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I know of at least one manufacturer that gives a brief tumble to remove lube but I think the negatives far outweigh the positves.

I don't know how long you'd have to tumble a round to break down the powder but it would happen sonner or later but probably a greater risk is popping a primer.

As I see it if you clean brass before loading and use carbide dies nothing else is needed. Where a case lube is needed I lean toward sparing use of one of the spray types- right now Midway's- and find that it can just be left to sit awhile and doesn't bother a thing. With larger caliber centerfire rifles I use a lube pad- again sparingly- and carry on.
 

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Pending Charlie's confirmation, I believe one of the major hazards associated with tumbling loaded rounds is removing deterrent coating (such as graphite) from powder granules, increasing their burn rate, which can, in turn, boost pressure.
 

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Lots of powder is "coated" -- especially stick powders for rifles. Tumbling scuffs off the coating. But I'd worry more about a primer going off from banging into the pointy tip of a rifle bullet.

I can't imagine any sort of logical reason why you'd want to tumble live ammo.
 

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J.D. Langendorph said:
Lots of powder is "coated" -- especially stick powders for rifles. Tumbling scuffs off the coating. But I'd worry more about a primer going off from banging into the pointy tip of a rifle bullet.

I can't imagine any sort of logical reason why you'd want to tumble live ammo.
Tumbling won't scuff off the coating if the load is compressed . . . I've heard of ammo being rendered dangerous by excessive tumbling or even being carried in the glove compartment of a Jeep for years, but these anecdotes are at least third or fourth hand . . . take them for what they're worth.

I think it would take one heck of a lot more kinetic energy for the pointy nose of a bullet to set off a primer than what you'd get in a typical home-size tumbler.

And as for tumbling live ammo - one colleague got some grungy, corroded, (I don't mean tarnished - it was covered with rough, thick green scale!) milsurp ammo for an old rifle of his and, knowing I was a reloader, asked me if I had a tumbler he could borrow to clean it up. I declined . . . and strongly suggested he not shoot that ammo at all, as the brass had certainly lost integrity. ("But it was SO cheap!!" )
 

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A few years back, someone on the FAL Files tumbled a load of 7.62x51 surplus ammunition for a week, extracting some cases every 24hrs & disassembling them to examine the powder.
At no point was there the slightest evidence of any breakdown of the powder (tipped onto white paper then off again & the paper microscopically examined for particles).
There was no perceptible variation in average velocity & extreme spread between any of the rounds from day one to the last day.
He didn't have any primers ignite either & I see no reason why they should at the kind of energy levels imparted in a tumbler, be it vibratory or rotary - heck; some surplus ammunition suppliers have used electric cement mixers as tumblers to clean up tarnished stuff.
 
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