Gunhub.com banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
:fire: Lately everywhere I go and everyone I meet seems to be, ‘running on a short fuse’ and about to explode! I wonder if it has anything to do with all of these aircraft, ‘chem-trails’ that I’ve been reading about?

Case in point: Over the Memorial Day weekend me and several other local guys, who met each other through Glock Talk, decided to go to a large shooting range in the area. Now this range is BIG. The firing line is, about, 100 yards wide with targets stretching all the way out to 300 yards. The extreme left end is set up for pistol shooting out to 50 yards. Our group set up targets along this end of the line; and, for the next 2 hours, we busied ourselves trying to outshoot each other. We were having a really good time!

At first we had the place all to ourselves; but, while we were shooting, 2 other vehicles and 3 other shooters appeared – All of them carrying rifles and occupying ports well away from us. Initially when we broke to go down to our targets, so did they; and (I have to be honest.) these 2 groups didn’t communicate with each other. Things continued like this; and 3 of us were busy shooting at the 50 yard targets when, suddenly, I heard a loud shout; ‘Hey, what the Hell’s the matter with you?’ ‘There’s two guys down at the targets!’ ‘STOP SHOOTING!’ I turned around to see a very large guy in a white tee shirt holding an M-14, muzzle up, with the butt resting on the point of his right hip. He’s standing about 60 yards away from me; and, as we looked at each other, (So help me.) I could see, ‘the steam’ coming off him!

Well, when I looked over at the hundred yard targets, sure enough, there’s his teenage son and a friend (?) very quietly setting up targets. I could have dropped my teeth! In a half century of shooting I’d never encountered a really bad firing line situation like this. We had been watching our targets; this rifleman and his kids were outside of our peripheral vision; and there they were, downrange; and dad was furious and in, ‘high protection’ operating mode.

We stopped shooting immediately; and I walked, a little, closer to this guy and shouted back; ‘We never saw the boys!’ His response sent chills up my spine. He suddenly slammed a magazine into the rifle and said; ‘What the Hell’s the matter with you?’ My mind started to go numb. All I could think of was the old axiom; ‘Never bring a pistol to a rifle fight.’ I made the only reply I could think of; ‘Why didn’t you call it out before the boys went down to the targets?’ He responded with an, almost involuntary, stroke on the bolt handle to charge the rifle’s chamber; and repeated himself. ‘What’s the Hell’s the matter with you?’

I quickly held out my hands, palms toward him, and said; ‘Listen, you’re supposed to call out, ‘Clear the line!’ before going down to the targets – understand?’ ‘It’s nobody’s fault – OK!’ ‘We, just, didn’t know the boys were down there.’ He didn’t answer; but he did take a few steps backwards and started looking around the ground at his feet. Then he put the M-14, down, on the bench and began to chain-smoke several cigarettes. For the next half-hour, or so, we were SUPER careful. Everything was strictly by the book: ‘Clear the line!’ ‘Is the line clear?’ ‘Ready on the firing line?’ ‘The line is ready!’ Thereafter everything seemed to go smoothly; and everyone went back to their own targets and shooting.

After awhile some of our guys left; and me and one other fellows were the only two shooters left, along the end of the line, by the pistol targets.

I finally decided that I’d had enough and shouted down the line; ‘Clear the line?’ The guy in the white tee shirt nodded his head and replied; ‘Yeah, OK!’ (The wrong language and NOT a good sign from, either, him or anyone else with him.) I went down to the 50 yard targets and start policing the area. Suddenly, ‘Blam!’ ‘Blam!’ Two rifle shots rang out; and I instinctively looked at my chest to see if I were hit! I felt fine; so I shook my head to gather my senses and looked over at the rifleman and his kids. He immediately turned to his son who was sitting at the bench, just, past him and said; ‘No, no, you can’t do that!’ ‘I thought of an appropriate wise crack; but, then, I remembered the M-14, and decided to remain silent. Our vehicles were parked a good 30 yards apart. I carried all of my gear over to a bench in front of my SUV and began to disassemble and clean my pistols.

While I was sitting there cleaning my guns this guy never looked at me, again; he didn’t do much more shooting, either. The kids shot for, about, another half-hour; and dad, once again, began to pace back and forth while chain-smoking. When two more groups of riflemen arrived, the three of them, suddenly, left without saying a word. That’s when I got, ‘the chills’ back and thought about never again using this range.

(It’s the same place where, 4 years ago, an armed man accosted me in what appeared to be an attempt to steal my empty gun. This guy came up behind me, very quietly, and waited until I had emptied my revolver before he, suddenly, revealed himself with a wide, ‘dirt-eating grin’ and the remark; ‘You shot ‘er dry – didn’t you!’ I subsequently discovered that he was armed with a small silver pistol which he wisely kept hidden inside his front left pocket. Before he produced it, I let him see my 9mm backup pistol. He quickly lost that grin; but he kept his left hand in his pants pocket the entire time he continued to engage me in a silly conversation that came across as, primarily, trying to distract me.)

I’m fortunate enough to be able to walk out my back door and, ‘go full-auto’ if I want to; or I can spend $10 bucks, and go over to a privately run shooting range where I can associate with other instructors and NRA members – all of whom I know well and trust with firearms. Unsupervised shooting ranges are never, really, safe; and I, just, got my second reminder to be extra careful around odd-behaving, ‘dumb-ass civilians’ with guns! :007:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Arc Angel, though I have never had an experience like that myself, I have read of other similar instances, and have gotten to the point that when I go to the range, I make sure I have one loaded gun on me at all times.

It seems that this facility could use a better safety system. I've seen ranges where there were lights used all along the firing line to indicate "safe to fire" or "unsafe to fire." A PA system would be a plus, too. That may be a lot of money to tie up in a relatively isolated place, but the cost is small compared to what the cost would be if someone were killed or injured due to an unintentional shooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
The range to which I belong has picked up numerous members who formerly used unsupervised public shooting areas. One of our members visited a "public range" and returned, telling us he was much more knowledgeable about rifling, since he'd had the opportunity to look down the barrels of other shooters' firearms.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,118 Posts
That is the exact reason I have built my own indoor range. Just recently learned (the hard way) that I will have to go to an outdoor range for shooting most of my rifles. My backer plate is a piece of 1" thick AR 500 plate that I got for free off of a customer that went out of business. I have it set into place at a 45degree angle. Got in a KelTec SU16 (.223) and wanted to pop off a round or two, so went into the range ----- suckers sparked when they hit the backer plate, and when I got right up to the plate, they had gouged about 1/4" ruts into the plate!! YIKES!!

Looking at the backer plate, it is interesting to see the different marks that the various calibers leave on it. There is no mistaking the .500 S&W Magnum bullet marks. With the hardness of my backer, the .223 was the first rounds that did not simply break apart upon impact. I have yet to find an intact bullet in the sand. All you see after shooting is where the lead splattered into the sand.

Mike
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top